AUTHOR: customer
TITLE: Fun in the Sun – Increasing Arm Strength and Handwriting – by Christina Mueller
STATUS: publish
ALLOW COMMENTS: 1
ALLOW PINGS: 1
CATEGORY: Strength
CATEGORY: Fine Motor Development
CATEGORY: Occupational Therapy
CATEGORY: Handwriting
CATEGORY: Home program

DATE: 6/11/2014 2:41:00 PM
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Here are some outdoor activities that can improve arm strength and handwriting

- Tug of war with a rope in the grass- Grab a friend and pull! This helps increase hand/arm strength

- Wheel barrow walks in the grass- This helps increase shoulder strength as well as helps to strengthen the core

- Car wash- Allowing your child to assist with washing the car can help strengthen the arms and shoulders and well as help with large movements of the shoulder. Shoulder stability is needed for handwriting

- Water balloon fight!- Assisting your child to help fill up water balloons, stretching the balloons filling them up and then tossing them helps to build strength and fine motor skills needed for handwriting

- Writing large letters and shapes with side walk chalk

- Using a squirt gun or hose to draw letters on the side walk

- Using window paint to write on windows or glass doors (washes off easily with water)

- Rubber Ducky-use rubber duckies in a pool to form letters

- I-Spy-have your child find things outside that start with the letters of the alphabet

Written by: Christina Mueller, MOT, OTR/L


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AUTHOR: customer
TITLE: What Developmental Skills Should My Child Be Doing By 6 Months Old?
STATUS: publish
ALLOW COMMENTS: 1
ALLOW PINGS: 1
CATEGORY: Development

DATE: 6/9/2014 3:08:56 PM
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GROSS MOTOR SKILLS
*    Sits alone for short periods
*    Rolls from back to belly
*    On belly, props on straight and bent arms

FINE MOTOR SKILLS
*    Grasp of a rattle using fingers and palm (squeeze grasp)
*    Beginning purposeful release, mostly reflexive
*    Reaches with 2 hands

SPEECH/LANGUAGE SKILLS
*    Searches for speaker
*    Recognizes own name
*    Babbles
*    Vocalizes feelings through intonation

If you child is not doing most of these skills by 6 months of age, please consult your pediatrician and consider a therapy evaluation to get some ideas of what you can do at home to encourage development.
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AUTHOR: customer
TITLE: Tips To Prevent Temper Tantrums – written by Jessi Coghill
STATUS: publish
ALLOW COMMENTS: 1
ALLOW PINGS: 1
CATEGORY: Behavior
CATEGORY: Parent Resources
CATEGORY: Occupational Therapy
CATEGORY: Home program

DATE: 6/6/2014 3:52:15 PM
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It’s normal for a toddler to have temper tantrums. But you may be able to reduce the frequency, duration or intensity of your child’s tantrums by following these parenting tips:

  • Know your child’s limits. Your child may misbehave because he or she doesn’t understand or can’t do what you’re asking.
  • Explain how to follow the rules. Instead of saying, “Stop hitting,” offer suggestions for how to make play go more smoothly, such as “Why don’t you two take turns?”
  • Take ‘no’ in stride. Don’t overreact when your toddler says no. Instead, calmly repeat your request.
  • Pick your battles. Only say no when it’s absolutely necessary.
  • Offer choices, when possible. Encourage your child’s independence by letting him or her pick out a pair of pajamas or a bedtime story.
  • Avoid situations that may trigger frustration or tantrums. If your child always seems to have tantrums at the grocery store, hire a sitter the next time you go shopping. Also know that children are more likely to act out when they’re tired, hungry, sick or in an unfamiliar setting.
  • Make it fun. Distract your child or make a game out of good behavior. Your child will be more likely to do what you want if you make an activity fun.
  • Stick to the schedule. Keep a daily routine as much as possible so that your child will know what to expect.
  • Encourage good communication. Remind your child to use words to express his or her feelings. If your child isn’t speaking yet, consider teaching him or her baby sign language.

If your child has a tantrum, remain calm and distract him or her. Ignore minor displays of anger, such as crying — but if your child hits, kicks or screams for a prolonged period, remove him or her from the situation. Hold your child or give him or her time alone to cool down.

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AUTHOR: customer
TITLE: Have an IPAD? Here are a few APPS that are therapeutic and fun! –By Laura Friedman
STATUS: publish
ALLOW COMMENTS: 1
ALLOW PINGS: 1
CATEGORY: Fine Motor Development
CATEGORY: Visual Motor Skills
CATEGORY: Speech/Language Skills
CATEGORY: Sequencing
CATEGORY: Development
CATEGORY: Speech Therapy
CATEGORY: Occupational Therapy

DATE: 6/3/2014 3:28:40 PM
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Letter School: This
is one of the best handwriting apps I and many other therapists have used.  It provides wonderful feedback for
letter formation patterns.  It is
graded and goes through three steps of learning the formation of each letter:
first you just press the button where each stroke would go and the app forms
the letter, next you touch and drag to form the letter, and lastly you form it
yourself on a chalkboard (and if that becomes too hard it recognizes the errors
and assist the child).  This app
can be used to work on letter formation, grasping patterns (if you use a
stylus), fine motor control, and eye-hand coordination.  Prices $2.99

My PlayHome: This
is a great app for working on daily life skills.  Each character can participate in a variety of activities of
daily living such as making food, eating, cleaning up, playing, brushing teeth,
taking a shower, and even gardening! 
Great for working on sequencing, play skills, planning, and ADLs.  Price $.99

Bugs and Buttons: This
is a great app for improving fine motor skills.  It is a collection of 18 various games.  It can be used to work on
visual-perceptual skills, timing, fine motor skills, and sequencing.  Price $3.99

Write My Name: Good
app for working on name recognition and letter sequencing for writing
name.  You can use a stylus to work
on grasp.  This is best for
practicing writing a child’s name.  Price $3.99

Touch and Say: A
great interactive app for learning colors, increasing vocalizations, identifying
emotions, and following directions. 
And it’s FREE!

Toca Hair Salon: This
is a great app especially if used with children who have sensitivities to
haircuts and /or the sounds of clippers. 
This can be used in a social story format to help children with the
sound.  It is also a great
sequencing task.  Price $1.99

Toca Store and Toca Tea Party: Both are good apps to work on social skills and turn
taking.  Price $1.99 for each

Dexteria: This
app is a set of hand exercises to improve fine motor skills and handwriting
readiness in children.  It builds
strength in the fingers, fine motor control, and overall dexterity!  Price $4.99

Letter Reflex: This
app is great for addressing common letter reversals like “b” or “d” and “p” or “q”
as well as numbers 3, 6, 9.  Price
$2.99

Toontastic: This
app is a lot of fun!
They pick a scene then add characters, dialogue, movement and music!
Great planning, organizing, and imagination activity! Price: FREE 

By: Laura Friedman, MS, OTR/L


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AUTHOR: customer
TITLE: Using YOUTUBE as a Teaching Tool to Promote Language Skills – by Christina Sanford
STATUS: publish
ALLOW COMMENTS: 1
ALLOW PINGS: 1
CATEGORY: Parent Resources
CATEGORY: Home program

DATE: 5/30/2014 3:46:05 PM
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Below is a list of some videos found online that promote language skills and teach basic preschool concepts, such as color, shape, and number recognition.

Check out these videos with your toddler or preschooler and while doing so, be expressive and make comments about what you are seeing, or what is happening during the video, (e,g. “look a train!, choo-choo”). After watching some videos more than once, you might want to offer your child a “choice” of which one he/she wants to watch. (i.e. “Do you want the SHAPE or the NUMBER train?”) to create an opportunity for he/she to request using words. Be expressive and repetitive and look to see how your child responds.

There is also a list of popular nursery rhyme videos. Nursery rhymes are one great way to interact with your child and allow them to “sing along” and move to the music. This encourages imitation of gestures, sounds, and words.

Alphabet

Alphabet Train

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YUtvaCGx05g&feature=related

The Phonics Song

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BELlZKpi1Zs

Alphabet Adventures with Shawn the Train

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Zac_LSiVAFk&feature=related

Shapes

The Shape Train

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6I2N-jCbha8

Shapes with Shawn the Train

http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=endscreen&NR=1&v=YsJmKTa1SXA

Colors

The Color Train

 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MZ8m2x0qbuo

The Butterfly Colors Song

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RPAZHVNVJp0

Number Recognition & Counting

The Number Train

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SkXfvAjZjFk

Learn Numbers with Shawn the Train

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1V4q60isaAg&feature=related

The Animal Sounds Song

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t99ULJjCsaM&feature=relmfu

The Fruit Train

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fwQaf3qK25Y

Nursery Rhymes & Songs

Old MacDonald Had a Farm

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5uQheMSKTD0&feature=relmfu

Twinkle Twinkle Little Star

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yCjJyiqpAuU

The Wheels on the Bus

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v_6KuYtc0Z8

Five Little Monkeys

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZhODBFQ2-bQ&list=PL028565C616627F50&index=8&feature=plcp

The Itsy Bitsy Spider

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Qee0Gmr9XJU

I know my children love these videos, and I had to share them. I hope you will take the time to check them out with your little ones too! If you have any questions regarding your child’s speech and language skills, or would like more ideas on activities that encourage language, contact me directly at csanford@abcpediatrictherapy.com

Written by: Christina Sanford, MA, CCC-SLP


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AUTHOR: customer
TITLE: Effects of W Sitting in Children
STATUS: publish
ALLOW COMMENTS: 1
ALLOW PINGS: 1
CATEGORY: Development
CATEGORY: Physical Therapy

DATE: 5/27/2014 3:52:00 PM
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Decreased Trunk Strength:

W-sitting in often used in children to compensate for decreased trunk strength by widening their base of support.  This position does not challenge their sitting balance and trunk strength to develop core stability.

 Decreased Crossing Over Midline:

W-sitting discourages full trunk rotation and crossing over midline with their arms (or the ability to shift their weight from side to side).  This delay of crossing over midline can also postpone the child developing a hand preference since objects on left are picked up by the left hand and objects on the right are picked up by the right hand.

Muscle Tightness:

W-sitting may decrease flexibility in a child’s hamstrings, hip abductors, internal rotators and heel cords (muscles of the hip, thigh and calf) by placing these structures in an extremely shortened range.

 

Orthopedic Concerns:

W-sitting may predispose a child to hip dislocation (the hip slipping out of the socket that holds the leg to the pelvis).  A research study using MRI has shown that during w-sitting all participants experienced hip subluxation (slipping of the 2 hip bones out of place).  1 Another study showed that habitual w-sitting may also lead to excessive lateral tibial torsion (the thigh bone rotating permanently out of line with the hip socket).2

 

 

1. Yamamura, M. et al. “An open-configuration MRI study of the femoro-acetabular impingement and subluxation in extreme leg position.”  International Congress Series 1268 (2004): 597-601.

2.  Magee, David J.  Orthopedic Physical Assessment>  Philadelphia: W. B. Saunders Company, 1997.

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AUTHOR: customer
TITLE: Ear Infections and Hearing Loss – by Lindsay Baker
STATUS: publish
ALLOW COMMENTS: 1
ALLOW PINGS: 1
CATEGORY: Speech Therapy
CATEGORY: Speech/Language Skills

DATE: 5/23/2014 5:50:54 PM
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Many young children suffer from ear infections.  Children with middle ear infection or fluid in the middle ear have some degree of hearing loss.  Whenever a child has any degree of hearing loss, they miss out on incidental learning. This refers to learning that happens simply from being in an environment and listening.  For example, a child in the grocery store listening to someone talking about the different foods they are ‘incidentally’ learning new vocabulary, sentences, intonation, and sounds.  It is important to manage ear infections from birth to three years (the ‘critical period’ for speech and language development) in order to reduce the possibility of the child having speech and language delays later.   

Written by: Lindsay Baker, MS, CF-SLP

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AUTHOR: customer
TITLE: Final Consonant Deletion – by Lindsay Baker
STATUS: publish
ALLOW COMMENTS: 1
ALLOW PINGS: 1
CATEGORY: Speech Therapy
CATEGORY: Speech/Language Skills

DATE: 5/22/2014 4:20:22 PM
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Final constant deletion occurs when a consonant is omitted.  Deleting final consonants typically occurs in children between two and three years of age.  For example, “lid” becomes “li” and “cup” becomes “cu”.  After three years old, children may need intervention to mark final sounds.

To help children produce the final sounds, using tactile and visual cues can often be helpful.  For example, say the beginning of the word then clap out the final sound and have the child clap it out along with you.  Jumping, stomping, or tapping out the final sounds may also be helpful.  You can also use blocks.  Use three blocks, one for each sound in a CVC (consonant-vowel-consonant) word.  Have the child say the word, they only get the blocks for the sounds that they produce.  For example, if they say “cu” for “cup” they only get two blocks. 

Toys are another way to prompt for final sounds.  Put out a boat and a bow and ask the child what they want.  If they want the boat, they have to say the final ‘t’ sound.  It is also important to model what sounds a child is missing in conversation, putting emphasis on the final sounds when speaking.

Written by: Lindsay Baker MS, CF-SLP

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AUTHOR: customer
TITLE: Sensory Activities for the Summer – by Hilary Lee
STATUS: publish
ALLOW COMMENTS: 1
ALLOW PINGS: 1
CATEGORY: seasonal activities
CATEGORY: Occupational Therapy
CATEGORY: Sensory

DATE: 5/20/2014 3:41:49 PM
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School is almost out and summer is about to start!  Below are some fun ways to incorporate sensory activities with your children during the summer:

  • Sand play – if you live near a beach (or are going to a beach), playing in the sand provides great tactile input for your child.  If not, you can use a sand box, sand table, or simply fill a plastic container with sand to play outside!
  • Water play – sprinklers, pools, splash pads, playing at the beach, or playing in a hose.  Some parks also have water play activities
  • Biking – ride a bike, scooter, tricycle, etc. – take them around the block or to a local park
  • Park – getting out to the park to swing, slide and climb is not only great for providing some sensory input, it is also great for strength, coordination, and social skills.
  • Hiking – take a hike through a nature preserve as a family
  • Sports and other activities – soccer, tee ball, baseball, swimming, art class

Written by: Hilary Lee, MS, OTR/L


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AUTHOR: customer
TITLE: Make Sure Our Special Kids Make Progress All Year Long
STATUS: publish
ALLOW COMMENTS: 1
ALLOW PINGS: 1

DATE: 5/16/2014 2:32:43 PM
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Children that have developmental deficits have choices for therapy.  These patients can get therapy at an outpatient facility or they can get therapy through their school during the school year.

Therapy at an outpatient facility can address any skill that is not at peer level.  Outpatient therapy is usually provided in a one on one individual setting.  It is billed to a health insurance company which may cause the family to incur some cost in copays and/or deductibles.  Number of therapy visits may also be limited by the family’s insurance company policy.  Some policies require that you prove the child is consistently attending therapy and, therefore, consistently making progress.

Therapy at a school can be provided individually or in a group.  The child must demonstrate a significant developmental deficit (at least 2 standard deviations below the norm) in order to qualify for therapy at school.  The good news is there is no cost to the family.  Here is the question:  How many sessions does the child actually get in a school year?  After the snow days, school holidays, IEP meetings, continuing education, Elmo’s birthday party and school assemblies, how many actual therapy treatments does the child get?

Every therapist’s goal is that the child makes progress.

I encourage every outpatient therapist to monitor the children that have been on their caseload at one time or another.  Make sure this child comes in for a recheck to be sure they are making progress whether at school or on their home program.  If the child is making progress, that is great news.  Communicate with the therapy provider, whether a parent on a home program or a school therapist, and commend them for the effort they have put forth to contribute to this child’s progress.  If the child has not made progress, discuss with the parent an alternative plan.  Maybe the child starts private therapy again.  Communicate with the school therapist and the parent on making modifications to the current plan to ensure change.  If the parent chooses not to initiate change at this time, agree on the next time to reconvene to review progress.  Get agreement that if progress is not made in an acceptable time frame that additional therapy, such as outpatient therapy, will be restarted.

Let’s make a new year’s agreement as therapists to be sure that every child that we touch makes significant progress in this new year.  We cannot “fix” each child.  We cannot “care” more than the caregiver.  What we can do is to be sure that share the knowledge we have.  We can be persistent in making sure the parents require that their kids make progress.

That is why many of us chose to go into pediatrics.  We want to make a difference in the life of a child.  Let’s make sure each child makes a difference.

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AUTHOR: customer
TITLE: Using a Therapy Ball at Home – by Erin Boling
STATUS: publish
ALLOW COMMENTS: 1
ALLOW PINGS: 1
CATEGORY: Physical Therapy
CATEGORY: Sensory
CATEGORY: Occupational Therapy

DATE: 5/14/2014 4:55:24 PM
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Using a therapy ball at home with your child can greatly contribute to your child’s success as it provides an extra pair of hands that help your child have greater control over their movements!  The ideas below can help your child with muscle strength, using their muscles in a controlled manner, sensory processing and balance control.

Activities (Please consult with your therapist to find out which are best for your child):

  • Allow your child to lay on their stomach over the ball and roll forward, back and side to side while playing a board game.
  • Help your child to lie on their back over the ball and reach to the floor with their hands over their head.
  • Have your child rest with their back against the ball with their feet on the floor.
  • Have your child sit on the ball with a straight back and feet on the floor and throw a medium sized ball overhead to you or the wall.
  • Have your child sit on the ball at the dinner table with feet on the floor to allow your child a sense of movement while staying seated.
  • Have your child perform the above exercises while playing board games, watching television, reading, doing homework or while throwing/catching/rolling a ball.
  • Some classrooms will allow your child to sit on a ball while doing class work as it can help your child have a sense of movement while staying seated.

Tip:  Small children or children who are very involved will do better on a large ball as this provides a larger surface area and they don’t have to work so hard against gravity.  If the child has milder problems a smaller ball will be more of a challenge.

 

Written by: Erin Boling, MOT, OTR/L


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AUTHOR: customer
TITLE: Handwriting Standards – by Lindsay Davidson
STATUS: publish
ALLOW COMMENTS: 1
ALLOW PINGS: 1
CATEGORY: Fine Motor Development
CATEGORY: Occupational Therapy
CATEGORY: Handwriting

DATE: 5/12/2014 4:05:09 PM
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Below are key points for quickly assessing your child’s handwriting compared to grade level standards.

Kindergarten Readiness

  • Identify and draw basic shapes: cross, circle square, triangle
  • Identify capital and lowercase letters as well as basic numbers (at least 1-10)
  • Draw a person or stick figure with 10 parts
  • Mature pencil grip
  • Appropriate writing posture with good stabilization of the opposite hand on paper

Kindergarten Printing Skills

  • Start letters and numbers at the top (except lowercase d, e)
  • Demonstrate correct sequencing and formation of letters
  • Orient letters and numbers correctly with few reversals
  • Write letters and numbers on the line with the appropriate size
  • Form each letter in name, moving left to right, beginning with a capital letter
  • Write 2-5 letter word, moving left to right, with defined space between letters and words, using ending punctuation appropriately

First Grade Skills

  • Mature pencil grip
  • Stabilize paper with non-writing hand
  • Start letters and numbers at the top (except lowercase d, e)
  • Orient letters and numbers on the line with the appropriate size
  • Begin each name with a capital
  • Write 2-7 letter words, writing left to right with appropriate spacing
  • Write 2-5 word sentences with a capital letter and appropriate punctuation, correct spacing
  • Combine sentences to express ideas or opinions

Second Grade Skills

  • Skills listed under kindergarten and first grade
  • Write 2-10 letter words with appropriate spacing and letter formation
  • Capitalize proper nouns
  • 2-8 word sentences, returning to the left margin of subsequent lines as needed
  • Using apostrophe and abbreviations with periods
  • Combine sentences to express ideas for 3-5 sentence paragraphs
  • Follow standard format for friendly letter including proper location for date, greeting, body of paragraph, closing, name/signature

Third Grade Skills/Pre-Cursive

  • Draw neat loops ascending and descending
  • Draw strokes that change directions
  • Use commas or quotation marks correctly
  • Use commas to separate items in a series or to set off phrases
  • Using appropriate spacing and punctuation
  • Write 5-6 sentence paragraphs with indent at the beginning of the paragraph to express ideas or opinions


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AUTHOR: customer
TITLE: Using Books to Teach Speech and Language Skills – by Jessica Teepen
STATUS: publish
ALLOW COMMENTS: 1
ALLOW PINGS: 1
CATEGORY: Reading
CATEGORY: Speech/Language Skills
CATEGORY: Parent Resources
CATEGORY: Language
CATEGORY: Development
CATEGORY: Speech Therapy
CATEGORY: Home program

DATE: 5/9/2014 1:44:12 PM
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Books can be a great, practical way to target speech and language skills. Listed below are some ideas to incorporate skills into joint storybook reading.


Articulation:

  • Have the child name pictures in the book that contain sounds you are working on (e.g. If the child is working on /s/ sound have them label pictures such as “sailboat, sun, boats, passing, etc.”)
  • If the child is able to read aloud have him or her read sentences/pages using correct sounds that he or she is working on
  • Have the child describe what is happening/going on in the pictures using correct sounds he or she is working on

Language Activities:

  • Pronouns: have the child talk about the male and female characters in the book using correct pronouns “he, she, his, hers, him, her”
  • Descriptions: have the child describe items within the book
    • Is the character nice or mean?
    • Is the fish water wet or dry?
    • Is the bear big or small?
  • Sequencing: have the child verbally (or with pictures) sequence events of the story using “beginning, middle and end”
  • “Wh-Questions”
    • Ask the child a variety of “wh” questions (e.g. what, where, when, why, how)
    • Examples:
      • “Who is the main character?”
      • “Where did the characters go?”
      • “What happened?”
      • “Why is the character sad?”
  • Inferences: have the child make a prediction of what will happen next or come to a conclusion
  • Rhyming: books with rhyming can allow the child to identify which words rhyme or make rhymes for words
  • Phonological Awareness
    • Multi-syllable words: you can break down multi-syllable (words containing 2, 3, 4+ syllables) words and have the child identify how many syllables/sounds are in the word (e.g. “tel-e-phone” has 3 syllables)
    • Blending: blend phonemes (letter sounds) together in words to see if the child can identify what the word is (e.g. “the sounds C-A-T make the word ____ [cat]”
    • Segmenting: have the child segment the phoneme sounds (letter sounds) in words (e.g. “what are all the sounds in the word ‘big’?” [B-I-G])

Fluency Activities:

  • Have the child use his/her “slow and easy” speech to describe what is going on in the pictures
  • Have the child discriminate between your “smooth” (speech without stuttering) and “bumpy” (speech with stuttering) reading voice while reading aloud

Voice:

  • If vocal abuse (e.g. screaming/straining voice) is an issue have the child practice using a “quiet” voice when talking about the story line or while reading aloud

Written by: Jessica Teepen MA, CCC-SLP


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AUTHOR: customer
TITLE: How to Elicit Language while Playing with Play Dough – by Terri Smock
STATUS: publish
ALLOW COMMENTS: 1
ALLOW PINGS: 1
CATEGORY: Speech Therapy
CATEGORY: Parent Resources
CATEGORY: Language
CATEGORY: Speech/Language Skills
CATEGORY: Home program

DATE: 5/7/2014 3:34:41 PM
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Requesting: Withhold cookie cutters and have your child use single, two, or three word phrases to request them to cut out objects in play dough.

Action words: Talk about “pounding”, “rolling”, “flattening”, “cutting” while doing the action and encourage your child to imitate.

Describing: Have your child tell you the color of play dough they want and the color cookie cutters they want. Make balls that are “big” and “little” or snakes that are “long” and “short” and have your child find the one you describe. Or ask your child to make something that is “big”.

Similarities and differences: Make two objects and talk about how the two things look the same or different (size, shape, color, etc.)

Turn taking: Take turns with cookie cutters, rolling pins etc. to increase social skills.

Pretend play: Pretend you are in a bakery and making lots of cookies or in Mcdonalds making hamburgers. Stores sell play dough kits that can help spark your creativity with this!

Sequencing and following directions: Involve the kids in making play dough. Work on sequencing skills and following directions by telling them what to do first, next and last. You could also work on following directions when playing by having your child make items out of the play dough that you request.

Wh questions: Ask “What are you making?”, “where should we put this piece?”, “why do we need to flatten the dough to make the cookie shape?”, “how do I make a snake?”

 

No Play dough at home? No problem! Here is a play dough recipe you can easily make:

Ingredients needed:

  • 1 cup flour
  • 1 cup warm water
  • 2 teaspoons cream of tarter
  • 1 teaspoon oil
  • 1/4 cup salt
  • food coloring

When in this process you allow your kids to assist is entirely up to you. Younger children can mix dry ingredients, older kids can stir (supervised) at the stove top, and adding food coloring is fun for everyone. My son is under two, so he mainly helps me with the “playing” part. Please supervise your children and use caution with the stove and hot dough.

  1. Combine all ingredients (except food coloring) in a medium-sized saucepan.
  2. Stir over medium heat until smooth.
  3. Stir continuously until the dough balls (about 1-2 minutes). Remove from heat.
  4. When dough is cool enough to handle, knead until smooth.
  5. Form into a ball.
  6. Divide into as many colors as you’d like to make. A single batch makes a good amount for four colors.
  7. Add food coloring to the divided dough. Gel food coloring works quite well. I have not tried liquid food coloring.
  8. Knead the food coloring into the dough. To protect your counter top, knead over wax paper. To protect your hands, wear plastic or rubber gloves, if you have them (you could also put the dough and food coloring inside a ziplock bag and have the kids squish it around inside).
  9. When the dough is a consistent color, ball and set aside.
  10. Repeat with the rest of your colors.
  11. Put the dough in separate containers. Toddler-sized snack containers are a good size, and I have also wrapped the colors individually in wax paper and stored in zip-lock baggies.
  12. Store in an airtight container until ready to use. It will stay soft for several weeks if stored airtight.

If you have any questions about how to elicit language in play at home please feel free to contact me at tsmock@abcpediatrictherapy.com

Written by: Terri Smock, MA, CCC-SLP


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AUTHOR: customer
TITLE: Developing Scissor Skills – Part 3 of 3
STATUS: publish
ALLOW COMMENTS: 1
ALLOW PINGS: 1
CATEGORY: Development
CATEGORY: Fine Motor Development
CATEGORY: Occupational Therapy

DATE: 5/5/2014 3:56:53 PM
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Cutting Tips

  • Have child begin cutting using automatic opening scissors
  • Start out by having child cut a thick line then fade gradually to thinner line
  • Smaller scissors help a child develop the grasp
  • If your child is left handed use left handed scissors
  • Use a smaller sheet of paper so that it is easier to hold

*** Make sure to teach scissor safety before giving your child scissors***


Activities

  • Cut playdoh using either playdoh scissors or child safe scissors
  • Cut straws, yarn, and strips of paper
  • Cut out magazines and advertisements
  • Have child cut out extra coupons
  • Draw a shape with glue let dry and have child cut out shape


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AUTHOR: customer
TITLE: Bike Riding Tips
STATUS: publish
ALLOW COMMENTS: 1
ALLOW PINGS: 1
CATEGORY: Strength
CATEGORY: Parent Resources
CATEGORY: Physical Therapy
CATEGORY: seasonal activities
CATEGORY: Development

DATE: 5/2/2014 3:04:07 PM
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We believe all children can ride a bike. Their bike might not look like the bike you ride, but it’s still a bike. Below are some tips to help teach your child how to transition to a 2 wheeler.

1) Use a 2 wheeler with training wheels to learn balance by getting on, off, starting, and stopping the bike on flat ground.
2) Use a 2 wheeler with training wheels to MASTER balance and speed by quickly pedaling without tipping over on flat ground.
3) Glide down a slight decline to improve control and safety on a 2 wheeler with training wheels (do not go too fast).
4) MASTER safety, control, and balance by gliding down a slight decline with a scooter (do not go too fast).
Once they have MASTERED the 4 steps above, they are ready to try a 2 wheeler with NO training wheels.
Call ABC Pediatric Therapy Network at 513-755-6600 if you have any questions about bike riding skills.

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AUTHOR: customer
TITLE: Developing Scissor Skills, Part 2 of 3
STATUS: publish
ALLOW COMMENTS: 1
ALLOW PINGS: 1
CATEGORY: Development
CATEGORY: Fine Motor Development
CATEGORY: Occupational Therapy

DATE: 4/30/2014 3:42:03 PM
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Development of scissor skills

  • 18-19 months: May use both hands to open and close scissors
  • 20-23 months: Children learn how to open and close scissors using one hand
  • 2-2.5 years: Child snips paper with scissors
  • 2.5 to 3.5 years: Child cuts 6 inch paper in half
  • 3.5 years: Child cuts 6 inch paper on line
  • 3.5 – 4.2 years: Cuts 4 inch circle within a quarter inch from the line
  • 4.5 years- cuts 4 inch square within a quarter inch from the line
  • 5-6 years- cuts complex shape ie. Heart


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AUTHOR: customer
TITLE: Developing Scissor Skills – Part 1 of 3
STATUS: publish
ALLOW COMMENTS: 1
ALLOW PINGS: 1
CATEGORY: Development
CATEGORY: Fine Motor Development
CATEGORY: Occupational Therapy

DATE: 4/28/2014 5:43:18 PM
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Pre-cutting skills

        

        Before children learn to cut they should be able to perform these skills:

    • Use a spoon or fork
    • Use both hands to complete one activity ie. Placing items in a jar while the other hand holds the jar
    • Isolate the thumb, index, and middle fingers ie. Counting on their fingers


     (hint: children should be able to show you on their fingers how old they are. For example, a two year old should be able to isolate index and middle finger)


   ** Consult with your occupational therapist to determine what is age appropriate for your child**

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AUTHOR: customer
TITLE: Physical Therapy and Orthotics
STATUS: publish
ALLOW COMMENTS: 1
ALLOW PINGS: 1
CATEGORY: Orthotics
CATEGORY: Physical Therapy

DATE: 4/25/2014 2:45:21 PM
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Physical therapists play a critical role in identifying the need for orthotics.  The decision to use orthotics is based on the assessment of range of motion, foot alignment, voluntary control of movement, muscle tone, and functional level of the child.  The foot provides stability and mobility; therefore, an orthosis will affect both of these functions.

  

Orthotics provide stability and improved function by controlling range of motion and posture.  They can be used for children who present with hypertonia or hypotonia.  In children with hypertonia, orthotics reduce the influence of abnormal tonic reflexes of the foot, ankle, and leg.  They decrease spasticity by prolonged stretch and pressure on the tendons of the triceps surea muscle and toe flexors.  In children with hypotonia, orthotics help to correct pes planus, therefore giving the child external stability of the foot and ankle. 

 

Children who wear orthotics present with a decreased amount of fixing and compensatory patterns because the orthotics require children to use and strengthen the appropriate muscles.  Wearing orthotics result in improved motions of the pelvis, trunk, and lower extremity.  They also prevent or support surgery and the use of Botox intervention.  

Most Common Types of Orthotics:

1. Plantar flexion stop ankle foot orthotics (AFOs) extend just distal to the knee and provide total contact with the ankle and foot.  With this type of orthosis, you can choose to have free dorsiflexion control by eliminating the strap that goes around the lower leg.  This type of orthosis prevents excessive ankle plantarflexion, and is used with children who require knee and ankle control. 

2. Supramalleolar AFOs extend just superior to the malleoli.  It is used for children who have knee control, but lack ankle control.  This orthosis offers the child external stabilization of the ankle and foot.

3. Foot orthotics do not extend to the malleoli.  Minimal control foot orthotics are shoe inserts, and maximum control foot orthotics extend just distal to the malleoli, controlling the calcaneus.  These are used mostly for children who pronate and only need a small amount of support.

Physical therapists at ABC Pediatric Therapy are trained to cast and measure for orthotics.  We are also trained in fitting and modifying them as necessary.  We most commonly recommend Cascade or Surestep orthotics, and work closely with area orthotists.  All orthotics are ordered based on the individual needs of the child.  Prices can vary depending upon the type of orthosis.  Insurance typically covers a portion of the cost of orthotics with a prescription from the doctor and a letter of medical necessity written by the therapist.  It is recommended that parents call their insurance company to verify the benefits covered under their specific insurance plan.

If you have a client who you think could benefit from orthotics, call ABC at (513)755-6600 –we are happy to answer any questions you may have. 

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AUTHOR: customer
TITLE: Apraxia vs. Articulation: What is the difference?
STATUS: publish
ALLOW COMMENTS: 1
ALLOW PINGS: 1
CATEGORY: Development
CATEGORY: Speech Therapy

DATE: 4/24/2014 2:43:08 PM
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Apraxia is defined as a difficulty with the voluntary control of muscle movements in a     coordinated fashion to produce a functional movement.  There are two types of apraxia that can affect a patient’s speech: verbal apraxia and oral apraxia.

Oral apraxia is a deficit in the control of non-speech oral motor movements such as sucking, blowing, and coughing. 

Verbal apraxia is a deficit in the coordination of the oral peripheral musculature.  This may affect the lips, tongue, and jaw which directly affects speech.

If a child is apraxic, they are often able to produce sounds/words spontaneously in isolation, but are not able to produce them upon request, when extending a lot of effort, or when using longer strings of words.  This can be confusing for parents. 

Apraxia

Difficulty may be on vowel sounds

Inconsistent errors including an increase in errors as the phrase grows longer

Most difficulty with sounds at the beginning of words or phrases

Spontaneous use of sounds better that non-spontaneous use (upon request)

Prosodic disturbances (the natural rising and falling of the voice) may accompany problems including: rate, intonation, and word stress

Groping behaviors such as sound prolongations (“IIIIIII want a ball”) and mouth movements without speech may be present (ie, holding an open mouth position with no sound ing coming out)

 Articulation

No difficulty on vowel sounds

Errors are consistent

Difficulty with sounds is the same at the beginning, middle, or end

No difference between spontaneous and non-spontaneous use of sounds

No prosodic disturbances (no issue with the natural rising and falling of the voice)

No groping behaviors (holding a letter sound as if stuttering or holding the mouth open while trying to say a word)

 

At ABC Pediatric Therapy, speech therapy involves using a multi-sensory approach, including movement and play to aide the child in improving intelligibility.  If you are interested in speech services at ABC Pediatric Therapy, please contact us at (513) 755-6600 or visit us on the web at:              www.abcpediatrictherapy.com

 

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COMMENT:
AUTHOR: mindy Kuchta
EMAIL: mkuchta@abcpediatrictherapy.com
IP: 208.102.1.188
URL:
DATE: 6/8/2011 3:00:20 PM
The differences can often be confusing. The speech team at ABC Therapy Network would be pleased to answer any questions you may have. We would love to partner with you and your child to overcome your child’s communication challenges. Enrollment in consistent intensive weekly services combined with family participation and follow through at home has resulted in significant successes in communication skills.
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AUTHOR: customer
TITLE: Spring Time Activities
STATUS: publish
ALLOW COMMENTS: 1
ALLOW PINGS: 1
CATEGORY: Development

DATE: 3/26/2014 6:02:04 PM
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Now that the warm weather is finally here it is time for some outside activities!!  As you know, outdoor activities are a great way for children to stay fit as well as release some excess energy.  Here are some gross motor activities that promote strength, motor planning, balance, reaction time and coordination.

Finding a good jungle gym is often hard to find!  Sharon Woods and Winton Woods are parks in Hamilton county with fantastic jungle gyms.  Pine Hills Park, Heritage Park, Corwin Nixon Park and Fleckinstein Park have great jungle gyms in Mason.  West Chester and Liberty Township have very fun jungle gyms as well as Fort Liberty Park and Keehner park.

When climbing up and down a jungle gym ladder, encourage your child to have their stomach against the ladder.  This makes all the right muscles work.  Going up is typically no problem but be careful when your child is learning to come down a ladder.  Your child may need verbal cues to look where they are placing their feet.  He/she may need manual help to find the step.

Have your child climb up a slide.  This encourages strengthening in the hands and legs.  It also requires them to be aware of their own safety.  Encourage them to look to the top of the slide first to be sure no one is there.

Monkey bars not only develop upper body strength but also encourages motor planning and weightshift so they can move across the length of the bars.

Swinging on a strap swing is grat for grip strength, trunk and abdominal stengthening and even motor planning in order to propel the swing.
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AUTHOR: customer
TITLE: Benefits of Speech Therapy and Oral-Motor Feeding Therapy for Children with Down Syndrome
STATUS: publish
ALLOW COMMENTS: 1
ALLOW PINGS: 1
CATEGORY: Development

DATE: 3/24/2014 7:11:21 PM
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Speech and Oral-Motor/Feeding Therapy aim at improving communication skills in the areas of sound and speech production, respiration and proper breath control for a variety of sounds, understanding and using a variety of language concepts, skills for social interaction, management and control of food for functional eating, and toleration of a variety of food textures.

Speech and Sound Production (Articulation)

Children with Down syndrome commonly have difficulty producing sounds that require strength and endurance of the mouth and jaw muscles (i.e. “j”, “l”), and regulating/differentiating air flow for a variety of sounds (i.e. “sh”, “s”, “f”). This is can lead to adults and peers having difficulty understanding wants and needs, which ultimately can influence social development, and reading and spelling skills.

Language and Social Skills

Children with Down syndrome commonly have difficulty following 2-3 step directions, using age appropriate sentence structure, answering yes/no questions, answering what/where/why questions, maintaining personal space, understanding body language, and understanding significance of vocal tone in a variety of social situations. This can lead to increased academic difficulty, increased difficulty with reading and writing, and maintaining interpersonal relationships.

Oral Motor/Feeding Skills

Children with Down syndrome commonly have larger tongues, and decreased lip, tongue and jaw strength. This can lead to difficulty managing and controlling food and secretions, eating a variety of textures of food, difficulty drinking from a cup or straw, difficulty eating from a spoon, and overall obtaining adequate nutrition and hydration.

Speech Therapy and Oral-Motor/Feeding Therapy have proven to be both needed and effective at improving deficits in these areas.

Speech-Language and Oral-Motor Feeding Therapy includes parent instructions on strategies for improving communication and feeding skills at home and in the community.

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AUTHOR: customer
TITLE: Speech and Language Skills in the Car – by Jessica Teepen
STATUS: publish
ALLOW COMMENTS: 1
ALLOW PINGS: 1
CATEGORY: Home program
CATEGORY: Speech/Language Skills
CATEGORY: Language

DATE: 3/21/2014 5:38:02 PM
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Car rides can be a great, practical, time efficient way to practice speech and language skills.


Articulation:

  • Have the child play games such as “I spy…” or “I see…” and find items that begin with speech sounds he or she is working on
  • Have the child practice words with speech sounds on the way to places (this may be a bit tricky since the child is not face to face with you)
  • Have the child label items in the car that begin with speech sounds (e.g. if the child is working on /s/ have them label “seatbelt, sun roof, seat” etc.)
  • While listening to the radio you can have the child practice his or her correct speech sounds while singing along (e.g. If working on “l” or “st” sounds you can have them practice “Twinkle, twinkle little star”

Language Activities:

  • “Wh-Questions”
    • Ask the child a variety of “wh” questions (e.g. what, where, when, why, how)
    • Examples:
      • “Who is driving the car?”
      • “Where are we going?”
      • “What do you see?”
      • “Why do we need to wear a seatbelt?”
  • Actions: have the child label what people are doing outside the car
    • He/she is: running, walking a dog, sitting, talking, driving, etc.
  • Pronouns: have the child talk about people that are outside the car using correct pronouns (e.g. “He/she is driving that car”; “That is his/her car”)
  • If the child is watching a movie in the car you can discuss the movie topic
    • “What is the movie about?”
    • “What happened in the beginning, middle, and end?”
    • “Who is the main character?”
    • “What is the main character like?”
    • Predictions- “What do you think will happen next?”
    • “Why is the character feeling that way?”
  • Descriptions: have the child describe items outside the car
    • Label colors of other cars (red, black, silver)
    • Tell if a car is going slow/fast
    • Is the car wet/dry? (e.g. if it is raining)
    • Is the car clean/dirty? (e.g. if going through car wash)
    • Is the truck big or small?
  • Sequencing: have the child talk about your scheduled errands (e.g. “First we are going to the store, then to the post office and last we will go to the park.”)
  • If you are picking your child up from school/friend’s house have him or her re-tell what he or she did using past tense/sequencing (e.g. “First I read a story, then I made a picture, and last I played with my friends on recess”)

Fluency Activities:

  • Have the child use his/her “slow and easy” speech to describe what is going on outside the car
  • Have the child use his/her “slow and easy” speech to tell you what he or she did when you pick him/her up from somewhere

Written by: Jessica Teepen MA, CCC-SLP


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AUTHOR: customer
TITLE: Why Moms of Special Needs Kids Rock!
STATUS: publish
ALLOW COMMENTS: 1
ALLOW PINGS: 1
CATEGORY: Parenting
CATEGORY: Special Need

DATE: 3/19/2014 2:43:22 PM
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*Because we never thought that “doing it all” would mean doing this much. But we do it all, and then some.

*Because we have discovered patience we never knew we had.

*Because we are willing to do something 10 times, 1,000 times if that’s what it takes for our kids to learn something new.

*Because we have heard doctors tell us the worst, and we’ve refused to believe them.

*Because we have bad days and breakdowns and bawl fests, then pick ourselves up and keep right on going.

*Because we manage to get ourselves together and out the door looking pretty damn good.  Heck, we even make sweatpants look attractive.

*Because we are strong.  Who knew we could be this strong?

*Because we aren’t just moms, wives, chauffeurs, cooks and women who work.  We are also physical therapists, speech therapists, occupational therapists, teachers, nurses, researchers, coaches and cheerleaders.

*Because we give our kids endless love and still have so much love left for our other kids, our husbands, our family.

*Because we understand our kids better than anyone else does – even if they can’t talk or gesture or look us in the eye.  We know.  We just know.

*Because we never stop pushing, or hoping, for our kids.

*Because just when it seems lik things are going OK, they’re suddenly not, but we deal.  We deal even when it seems like our heads or hearts might explode.

*Because when we look at our kids we just see great kids.  Not kids with cerebral palsy/autism/Down Syndrome/whatever label.

Originally adapted from the author’s blog, lovethatmax.com, taken from “all you” magazine, April issue

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AUTHOR: customer
TITLE: Tips to Help Your Child Tolerate Loud Noises – by Hilary Lee
STATUS: publish
ALLOW COMMENTS: 1
ALLOW PINGS: 1
CATEGORY: Sensory
CATEGORY: Occupational Therapy

DATE: 3/10/2014 4:26:14 PM
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Many children have difficulty with tolerating loud noises or noisy environments.  Below are some ideas of activities that may help your child:

  • Play with toys that make noise as tolerated so they can get used to noise (such as trucks, toy vacuum, musical instruments)
  • Have music playing while you are playing with your child
  • When going to a noisy event (such as a party) arrive early before it becomes noisy so they do not get as overwhelmed
  • Write a story with pictures about loud noises and what they can do if it is too loud
  • Work with your child to develop a list of ideas that can calm them when they are in a noisy place or startled by an unexpected sound (such as taking a deep breath, chewing gum) 
  • Create a quiet place they can go if they become overwhelmed with noise (if you are out somewhere, scout out a place where your child can go if is becomes too loud so they feel more comfortable)
  • Reduce background noise at home by turning off the radio or television when you are not using them
  • Give your child warning when there is going to be a loud noise when possible (such as the vacuum or blender at home) so they can prepare themselves
  • Allow your child to wear headphones to reduce noises when it is too loud
  • Have a dance party with music (maybe even using instruments if you would like)

Written by: Hilary Lee, MS, OTR/L

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AUTHOR: customer
TITLE: How Does Your Engine Run? The Alert Program – by Lindsay Davidson
STATUS: publish
ALLOW COMMENTS: 1
ALLOW PINGS: 1
CATEGORY: Behavior
CATEGORY: Occupational Therapy

DATE: 3/7/2014 5:05:29 PM
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In the practice of pediatric Occupational Therapy, it is common for therapists to use a program with their
patients called How Does Your Engine Run?
The Alert Program
.  The program
was designed by two Occupational Therapists. It is used by teachers, camp leaders,
and parents.  It is focused on the
arousal level of a child’s body and refers to their body as an engine.  If a child is running, jumping, having
a hard time listening and following directions, then they are moving fast and
is said to have their engine running “high.”  If a child is listening, following directions, and calm,
then they are “just right?”  If a
child is falling asleep, slouching, or yawning, then they are moving slowly and
their engine is running “slow.” 

Often times, therapists may use
animals to depict the 3 levels or arousal.  For example, a cheetah can be used for a child whose engine
is fast/high, a turtle for a child whose engine is slow/low
and a horse for a child who is just right.  Any animal can be used with a child as long as they depict
the correct image (ie. A snail also moves slow and can be used to represent a
low engine).  Using colors, or
characters (Tigger, Winnie the Pooh, Eeoyre) can also be used as the different
engine levels. 

After the child understands the
three levels, the next step is for the child to identify for themselves how
their body is running.  This will
help the child be more in tune with their body and will then allow them to
learn how to control it.  Once the
child accurately identifies how their body is running, then they are then
taught how to change their engine so that it is at the optimal level of just
right.  If a child’s engine is
high, the child may enjoy swinging in a steady linear fashion, giving
themselves a strong hug, or taking 10 slow deep breaths.  If a child’s engine is low, the child
may enjoy doing jumping jacks, chewing gum, or push-ups to increase their level
of arousal to just right for more alertness.  If a child’s engine is just right, they don’t need to alter
anything since they are at their optimal level of arousal, but should
understand what they are doing to make them just right and maintain it. 

The end goal of the program is
for children to be able to identify how their body is feeling, know what
activity can adjust it to the appropriate level, carry out that activity; then
function, learn, and interact optimally in their environment.

If you have any questions or
concerns regarding your child, please contact ABC Pediatric Therapy so an Occupational Therapist can help at 513-755-6600!

By Lindsay Davidson, MOT, OTR/L


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AUTHOR: customer
TITLE: Tonsillectomies
STATUS: publish
ALLOW COMMENTS: 1
ALLOW PINGS: 1
CATEGORY: Feeding
CATEGORY: Speech/Language Skills

DATE: 3/5/2014 6:48:20 PM
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Guidelines for considering a tonsillectomy indicate:

-at least seven episodes of throat infection in a year as documented by a physician

-at least five episodes each year for two years as documented by a physician

-three episodes annually for three years as documented by a physician

Even if a child meets the criteria, it may not be in the child’s best interest to undergo surgery.

Pros                                                                        Cons

Improved sleep                                     Minimal improvement in throat infection

Improved behavior                               Post-operative complications with infections and bleeding

Improved growth                                   Post-operative pain

Decreased bedwetting


What this means for speech and feeding development….

  • Speech
    • Children who have enlarged tonsils often have difficulty producing sounds that come through the nose (because the air pathway is blocked by the tonsils), such as /m/, /n/, and /ing/ and without these sounds and the natural flow of air through the nose, the child can be very difficult to understand
    • Having a smaller area for air to move in the back of throat can affect the intonation and overall quality of all sounds. The child’s speech may not sound as “clear” or “articulated” as other children’s
    • Children with enlarged tonsils often have trouble controlling their breathing, and being able to produce enough airflow for longer words and sentences. This can affect their able to use age appropriate phrases and sentences, produce 2 and 3 syllable words, and produce sounds that require a greater amount of air (such as /s/, /f/, /ch/ and /sh/)
  • Feeding
    • Children who have enlarged tonsils may have a harder time (more effortful) swallowing secondary to the tonsils being enlarged and therefore may not like eating chewier foods that already are more difficult to swallow
    • Children may spit or drool more secondary to increased irritation in the back of the throat
    • Feeding might overall be more messy secondary to increased irritation in the back of the throat
    • Secondary to more effortful swallowing, intake at each meal may be slight reduced


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AUTHOR: customer
TITLE: Oral Motor/Feeding Skills and Speech Sound Development Relationship
STATUS: publish
ALLOW COMMENTS: 1
ALLOW PINGS: 1
CATEGORY: Feeding
CATEGORY: Oral Motor

DATE: 3/3/2014 5:55:19 PM
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Because we use the same muscles to talk that we use to eat. We often see weakness in both areas.

When there is muscle weakness or difficulty coordinating the muscle movements for speech, if a similar movement is needed in feeding, it will also be affected. For instance if a child has difficulty producing /l/ (tongue tip up sound), you may see difficulty removing food stuck on then roof of the mouth, or on the upper lip. Therefore, speech therapists often use feeding exercises to aid in development of speech sounds. For instance you may see the following:

 

If a therapist is working on upper lip movement on a spoon or a cup

This will aid in development of/m,b,p/

 

Working on movement of lower lip

This will aid in development of /f,v/

Working on straw drinking

This will aid in development of vowel sounds, tongue retraction for /k,g/ and lip rounding for /w,sh,ch/

Working on jaw strength and endurance with chewing

This will aid in overall intelligibility, production of sounds that require jaw strength and stability, such as /s,z,sh.ch/

Working on removing food from the roof of the mouth or from the upper lip

This will aid in tongue tip up sounds and sounds that require the jaw and tongue to move independently, i.e. /t,d,n,l/

 

Strengthening the muscles for feeding, will additionally strengthen them for speech, and strengthening them for speech, will strengthen them for feeding.

 


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AUTHOR: customer
TITLE: Astronaut Training….It’s Not Just for Astronauts! – by Lindsay Davidson
STATUS: publish
ALLOW COMMENTS: 1
ALLOW PINGS: 1
CATEGORY: Visual Motor Skills
CATEGORY: Sensory

DATE: 2/28/2014 4:48:11 PM
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What does astronaut training have to
do with your child’s therapy? 
Whether your child receives speech, physical, or occupational therapy, astronaut training can help incorporate appropriate sensory integration by
providing input through the central nervous system.  Everything we do is
affected by sensory integration. 
The astronaut training is a type of vestibular protocol to facilitate
appropriate vestibular, auditory, and visual processing. 

The vestibular area of the sensory
system affects movement –balance, knowledge of where we are in space, and how
fast or slow our body is moving. It is located in the inner ear and acts like
the “compass” to our body.  It
gives our brain input and understanding of the position of our head and body in
relation to the pull of gravity.  Vestibular
deficits are usually seen in children with delayed milestones, decreased
attention and ability to follow directions, language disorders, learning
disabilities, and poor coordination. Other characteristics children may
demonstrate include clumsiness, fearful of movement, or may bump into things
often (poor body awareness). The vestibular system works with the visual system
to give our body more input and meaning to our life. Along with strong core
strength or stability, the vestibular system allows our bodies to focus our
eyes on a target while moving.  If
our sensory system is not interacting appropriately together, information our
brain is receiving from our environment is being interpreted improperly which
makes it hard to read, write, throw a ball at a target, and other everyday tasks that are important for development.

 The visual system lets our body know if we are moving or
standing still, if we are close or far away from an object, and how far to
throw a ball to someone or at a target. 
Our visual system also works closely with the vestibular system by
letting our brain know our body’s position in space depending on what we see or
how we are seeing things –if we are upside down, sideways, spinning around, or
sitting upright.

The auditory system helps us because it gives us information about orientation by sound. It helps our
brain and body in “flight or fight” responses to alert our body and muscles to
be attentive.  It lets our body sit
upright, turn our head or body appropriately, visually locate the source of
sound, and in what direction it’s coming from. All areas of the sensory system are required to work
together appropriately throughout each day while we complete all day to day
activities or tasks.

            So
how does the astronaut training work? 
During the astronaut training, the child lays on their side in a fetal
position on a spin board.  The
therapist may ask the child to keep their eyes closed while the therapist spins
the child in one direction for about 10-20 revolutions before stopping. During
spinning, the eyes are trying to focus on objects around the room.  When the child stops spinning, the eyes
typically continue to move in attempt to orient the body in space.  These eye movements are called
nystagmus or saccades.  They should
be seen at half the time the child was spinning; for example 5 seconds of saccades
for 10 revolutions.  The therapist
will then complete the same protocol with the child lying on the other side. The
child is under-responsive if the eyes are not moving or do not demonstrate the
appropriate saccades; and over-responsive if the eyes are moving too fast.
Using the astronaut training program, we are training the brain to process
movement information correctly so that our body can be more organized!

Written by: Lindsay Davidson, MOT, OTR/L


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AUTHOR: customer
TITLE: Games to Target Articulation Skills in Conversation – by Jessica Teepen
STATUS: publish
ALLOW COMMENTS: 1
ALLOW PINGS: 1
CATEGORY: Speech/Language Skills
CATEGORY: Home program

DATE: 2/25/2014 6:13:31 PM
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Listed are some games/activities that encourage talking and may be a fun way to practice speech sounds in conversation.

  • Guess Who?
  • Pictionary
  • Go Fish
  • “I spy with my little eye…”
  • Catch Phrase
  • Taboo
  • Outburst
  • Clue
  • “I am going on a picnic and I am going to bring…”
  • Hangman
  • Scattegories
  • Who Wants To Be a Millionaire?
  • Are You Smarter Than a Fifth Grader?

Written by: Jessica Teepen, MA, CCC-SLP


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AUTHOR: customer
TITLE: Tips for Cutting Nails for the Sensory Defensive Child
STATUS: publish
ALLOW COMMENTS: 1
ALLOW PINGS: 1
CATEGORY: Sensory
CATEGORY: Occupational Therapy

DATE: 2/20/2014 5:28:09 PM
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Cutting a child’s nails can be difficult, especially if your child has sensory processing challenges.  Below are some tips to make cutting your child’s nails easier:

-Try cutting nails after bathtime.  Typically a child will be calmer after a bath, and their nails are softer making them easier to cut.
-If they do not tolerate cutting, try using a nail file often to keep their nails short instead.
-Apply deep pressure to the fingertips before cutting the nails.
-Give the child a hand massage with lotion or Vaseline before cutting nails.
-Sing a song or allow the child to watch a video to distract them while cutting their nails.
-Allow your child to choose the day of the week or time of day that you will do the nail cutting.  Allowing them to have soom control might make the process less of a challenge.

Written by: Hilary Lee, MPH, MS, OTR/L

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AUTHOR: customer
TITLE: Enforcing Consequences To Behavior by – Jessi Coghill
STATUS: publish
ALLOW COMMENTS: 1
ALLOW PINGS: 1
CATEGORY: Behavior
CATEGORY: Parent Resources
CATEGORY: Parenting

DATE: 2/17/2014 4:54:06 PM
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Despite your best efforts, at some point your toddler will break the rules. Consider using these parenting tips to encourage your child to cooperate:


  • Natural consequences. Let your child see the consequences of his or her actions — as long as they’re not dangerous. If your child throws and breaks a toy, he or she won’t have the toy to play with anymore.
  • Logical consequences. Create a consequence for your child’s actions. Tell your child if he or she doesn’t pick up his or her toys, you will take the toys away for a day. Help your child with the task, if necessary. If your child doesn’t cooperate, follow through with the consequence.
  • Withholding privileges. If your child doesn’t behave, respond by taking away something that your child values — such as a favorite toy — or something that’s related to his or her misbehavior. Don’t take away something your child needs, such as a meal.
  • Timeout. When your child acts out, give a warning. If the poor behavior continues, guide your child to a designated timeout spot — ideally a quiet place with no distractions. Enforce the timeout for one minute for every year of your child’s age. If your child resists, hold him or her gently but firmly by the shoulders or in your lap. Make sure your child knows why he or she is in the timeout. Afterward, guide your child to a positive activity. If all else fails, tell your child that you are taking a timeout away from him or her for a few minutes because of a specific behavior. Be sure to explain the behavior you’d like to see.

 

Whatever consequences you choose, be consistent. Make sure that every adult who cares for your child observes the same rules and discipline guidelines. This reduces your child’s confusion and need to test you. Also, be careful to criticize your child’s behavior — not your child. Instead of saying, “You’re a bad boy,” try, “Don’t run into the street.” Never resort to punishments that emotionally or physically harm your child. Spanking, slapping and screaming at a child do more harm than good.

Set a good example

Children learn how to act by watching their parents. The best way to show your child how to behave is to set a positive example for him or her to follow!

 

Mayoclinic.com has some more good resources and tips for toddlers behaviors.

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AUTHOR: customer
TITLE: How to Help When Your Child Loses Control of Their Emotions
STATUS: publish
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CATEGORY: Behavior

DATE: 2/14/2014 5:06:32 PM
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I often hear my parents express concerns about their children having temper tantrums or negative behaviors and they aren’t sure how to deal with them or just discipline them.  If your child has Sensory Integrative Dysfunction they are often unable to tolerate certain types of stimulation.  Think of some common situations when children often get in trouble: over excitement or overstimulation while in a large group of people (e.g. holiday gatherings, birthday parties); or at the dinner table when they don’t want to eat what the family eats or cannot sit still.

These activities can place a lot of demands on an individual’s sensory system and cause them to lose control because they are either sensitive to sounds, crowds, too much touching by loved ones or strangers, and/or smells. 

Tips to help your child:

  • Try to recognize the signs indicating your child is not tolerating a certain environment (covering their ears, yelling, getting upset easily, overexcitement).  If you can, remove him/her from that situation or try to control the amount of stimulation. 
  • Remain a good model by remaining in control yourself.  You can also try to provide sensory input that is calming to your child, such as a hug, a back rub, or slow rocking. 
  • Consider giving them something to hold like a blanket, pillow, stuffed animal or fidget toy as an option to calm down.
  • Go outside for a quick large muscle activity like jumping jacks, a brisk walk/run, or a short obstacle course.


No child is perfect and all children require discipline at some point.  First, focus on reinforcing good behavior.  Children with sensory integrative issues may have low self-esteem and should not be criticized.  You should also be aware of how your discipline techniques affect your child’s sensory system.  Be realistic with your expectations and understand that not all children have the same capabilities.  Finally, be consistent in handling inappropriate behaviors so as not to confuse your child.


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AUTHOR: customer
TITLE: Shared Reading – by Michelle Huss
STATUS: publish
ALLOW COMMENTS: 1
ALLOW PINGS: 1
CATEGORY: Development
CATEGORY: Fine Motor Development
CATEGORY: Speech/Language Skills
CATEGORY: Reading

DATE: 2/12/2014 5:23:58 PM
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Shared reading is a method that helps build a child’s language abilities at all ages and developmental levels.  Shared reading occurs with parents, family members, teachers, or therapists reading a storybook with the child multiple times across several days/weeks.  During these readings, the children are encouraged to be actively involved.
 
How to do shared reading:
-talk about different pictures in the book that the child may be looking at or pointing to
-picture/activity naming
-describe textures, colors, counting
-ask questions about the story as appropriate
-describe vocabulary

Activities that can be incorporated to help fine motor/gross motor skills:
-acting out the story
-make puppets to act out the story
-create pictures for the story and retell with a story board

Benefits of shared reading:
-opportunities for concept and language expansion
-awareness to print, tracking print left to right/word to word
-familiarity with language patterns
-sound, letter, and word recognition
-story prediction/inferencing
-enjoy and participate in reading
-build a sense of story
-expand vocabulary
-awareness of print (spacing, capitalization, punctuation)
-sequencing stories
-story elements (characters, setting, beginning, middle, end)

Written by: Michelle L. Huss, M.A. CCC-SLP

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AUTHOR: customer
TITLE: Strategies to Increase Communication in Toddlers – by Christina Sanford
STATUS: publish
ALLOW COMMENTS: 1
ALLOW PINGS: 1
CATEGORY: Development
CATEGORY: Speech Therapy
CATEGORY: Speech/Language Skills
CATEGORY: Language

DATE: 2/10/2014 6:19:14 PM
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For a toddler that is learning to talk, it is vital to create a fun learning environment by simply embedding opportunities into their daily routines. There are many things you can do throughout the toddler’s day to help elicit language skills.

Dressing time/Bath time:

1) Offer choices of things to wear (e.g. “Do you want the blue shirt or the red shirt?”) This creates an opportunity for your toddler to not only hear more words, but also verbalize (or point) to a choice.

2) Comment on what you are doing while dressing, describing the items of clothing/body parts. This will elicit imitation of functional words.

3) Label body parts in the bath tub/while dressing.

4) Discuss “on” and “off” and “in” and “out” (e.g. shoes on, socks off) concepts

5) Make lots of sounds/expressions while in the bathtub, describe what is happening, splash the water, use bubbles etc.


Mealtime:
1) Give the child less food than usual, to encourage requesting “more” (e.g. “more crackers”)  You can try giving the child two crackers instead of the entire bag.
2) Comment on what he/she is doing during the mealtime, be descriptive. Again, this creates an opportunity for the child to imitate words he/she hears.
3) Keep favorite snacks or items out of the child’s reach so that he/she can point or ask for the snack (i.e. up on a shelf/out of reach)


Story time:
1) Comment on what you are reading, describe the “actions” (e.g. “Look he is eating!” mmm! Yummy apples, he likes apples! Do you like apples?”
2) Encourage the child to turn the pages, have the child follow the direction of “turn the page”
3) Label pictures to encourage imitation of words.


Playtime:
1) Get down on the floor and PLAY! Be expressive, interact, and over exaggerate words and make lots of sounds to elicit imitation of simple sounds and words (e.g. “Weee! up-up-up goes the plane, wow!”) It is ok to act silly, toddlers love it!
2) Participate in turn-taking, stating, “my turn!”
3) Comment on what you are doing, using lots of words to encourage imitation.

Written by: Christina Sanford, MA, CCC-SLP

 


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AUTHOR: customer
TITLE: Toot Toot!!
STATUS: publish
ALLOW COMMENTS: 1
ALLOW PINGS: 1
CATEGORY: Development
CATEGORY: Speech Therapy

DATE: 2/7/2014 5:26:16 PM
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What is speech?

Speech is made up of oral motor skills, respiration (airflow), and phonation (voice).

What are oral motor skills?

Oral motor skills are the complex and coordinated movements of the lips, teeth, tongue, jaw, and cheeks that your child uses for speech production.

How can whistles help?

  • Facilitate lip closure, lip rounding, lip protrusion, respiration, tongue retraction, prolongation of controlled air flow for sounds such as (s, z , sh , ch, j, f, and v)
  • Decrease drooling
  • Establish jaw stability
  • Promote facial symmetry and muscle tone

Participation with whistles facilitates the skills required for adequate articulation skills in a fun and motivating way.

Let your child play with and explore all the whistles.  Some of them will come easily at first and some will be more difficult.  Your therapists will explain how difficult whistles can be modified and how to encourage your child to participate in a variety of ways with all of the whistles.
 

ABC Pediatric Therapy Network sells whistle kits at our Centerville office (8000 Miller Farm Lane).  Or, you can buy whistles at a store. The current cost of the basic kit is $5.00.  You may purchase individual whistles or more whistles to supplement your kit.  These costs can be acquired at the front desk.  Thank you for providing your child the tools and support needed to succeed in therapy. 

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AUTHOR: customer
TITLE: Olympic Themed Speech & Language Activities – by Christina Sanford
STATUS: publish
ALLOW COMMENTS: 1
ALLOW PINGS: 1
CATEGORY: Speech Therapy
CATEGORY: Speech/Language Skills

DATE: 2/5/2014 4:38:09 PM
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The Olympic Games are here! Are you a fan? If so, here are
some great ways to target speech and language skills into watching or
discussing the games!

Flag Fun: Have your child color and cut out a picture of a
flag from another country or their home country! This can lead to great
conversation about countries and cultures around the world, as well as
addressing even the more simple concepts (colors, shapes, sizes).

Pronouns & Action Words: While watching or discussing
the games, you can target action words and pronouns! (running, kicking,
flipping, twisting, turning, moving, winning, HE is racing, SHE is running
fast)

WH question practice: While watching or discussing the
games, you can target asking and answering questions, for example, “What is he
doing?”, “What is your favorite sport to watch?”, “Why is he running fast?”.
“Where are they standing?”

Toddler ideas: If the games are on your TV, your toddler may
or not seem interested, but there are lots of opportunities to model  expressions, single words, and simple phrases
during an Olympic event. For example, “Go-go-go!”, “Oh no”, “He won!”, “WOW!”.
Again, you can even make comments about what is happening during the events, be
expressive and repetitive to encourage your toddler to imitate!

Enjoy watching the 2014 Winter Games, if you have other
ideas or hands-on activities, I’d love to hear about them!

 

Written by: Christina Sanford MA CCC-SLP

csanford@abcpediatrictherapy.com


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AUTHOR: customer
TITLE: Childhood Apraxia of Speech – by Christina Sanford
STATUS: publish
ALLOW COMMENTS: 1
ALLOW PINGS: 1
CATEGORY: Speech Therapy
CATEGORY: Speech/Language Skills
CATEGORY: Development

DATE: 2/3/2014 5:24:11 PM
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What is it?

The American Speech-Language & Hearing Association (ASHA) defines Childhood apraxia of speech (CAS) is a
neurological childhood (pediatric) speech sound disorder in which the precision
and consistency of movements underlying speech are impaired in the absence of
neuromuscular deficits (e.g., abnormal reflexes, abnormal tone). CAS may occur
as a result of known neurological impairment, in association with complex
neurobehavioral disorders of known or unknown origin, or as an idiopathic
neurogenic speech sound disorder. The core impairment in planning and/or
programming spatiotemporal parameters of movement sequences results in errors
in speech sound production and prosody (ASHA).

The child’s ability to understand language (receptive
ability) is broadly within normal limits, but his or her expressive speech is
seriously deficient, absent, or severely unclear. This is an important factor
and one indicator that the child may be experiencing more than
“delayed” speech (apraxia-kids.org).

 

How is it diagnosed?


If you have concerns with your child’s speech and language
development, you should first seek help from your child’s pediatrician. A
license speech-language pathologist will evaluate and diagnose a child with
suspected CAS since it is a communication disorder. At the evaluation, here is
what you can expect to be observed/assessed:

  • Your
    child’s ability to both use (expressive language) and understand words
    (receptive language), phrases, final speech sounds in words, grammar, etc.
    will be evaluated and compared to what is typical for their age range and
    how they are currently functionally communicating wants and needs.
  • The
    child’s oral (mouth) structures and the oral cavity will be examined to
    determine that they appear normal and are in good working order for speech
    and feeding skills. The SLP will examine your child’s face to see if it
    appears symmetrical and will see how and if they are able to move their
    lips, tongue, jaw and soft palate appropriately.
  • The
    SLP will see how the child engages in social interaction, listens and
    responds. The SLP will also see how your child attempts to communicate
    through the use of gestures (i.e. pointing).
  • Observations
    will be made about the child’s respiratory system and if they seem to have
    enough airflow to sustain speech; their posture and how they hold their
    bodies; if they appear to have enough muscle strength and muscle tone for
    speech, and if the quality of their voice seems appropriate.

Christina Sanford MA CCC-SLP

csanford@abcpediatrictherapy.com


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AUTHOR: customer
TITLE: Tummy Time, Part 2 of 2, Suggestions for Tummy Time
STATUS: publish
ALLOW COMMENTS: 1
ALLOW PINGS: 1
CATEGORY: Development

DATE: 1/31/2014 6:31:34 PM
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Suggestions for Children who are Resistant to Tummy Time

  • Perform tummy time for short intervals (10-15 mins), several times per day
  • Use a small towel roll, boppy pillow, or your leg under your baby’s chest and arms to assist in shifting their weight back from their upper body.
  • On the floor, make sure your baby’s arms are under their chest.  Encourage your baby to lift their head.
  • Lay your infant on their belly on top of your chest.  The more you recline back, the more work your child will be doing.  In this position they will be able to see your face well and will feel comforted by being up against you.
  • When doing tummy time on the floor, put slight pressure on your baby’s bottom – toward their feet.  This will help put their weight through their hips to make it easier for them to push through their arms.
  • Use toys, music and your face for motivation – get to their level.  Lay on the floor with them with your face in front of theirs.

If you have any questions, feel free to call or email Sarah King, PT, MPT at ABC Pediatric Therapy Network at (513) 755-6600 or sking@abcpediatrictherapy.com.

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AUTHOR: customer
TITLE: Tummy Time, Part 1 of 2, Benefits and Developmental Milestones
STATUS: publish
ALLOW COMMENTS: 1
ALLOW PINGS: 1
CATEGORY: Development

DATE: 1/29/2014 6:20:00 PM
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Tummy Time – Parent Handout

  • Tummy time is needed everyday from the day you bring your baby home from the hospital and is essential in promoting gross motor, fine motor and sensory development.
  • Tummy time should always be supervised and can be done anytime your child is awake.
  • Tummy time should be fun and provide opportunities for learning.  It is also a great time for parents to bond with their baby.

Benefits of Tummy Time

Strengthening

Develops hand function

Promotes motor development

Develops hand eye coordination

Promotes interaction with their environment

Increases a child’s confidence and sense of independence

Tummy Time Milestones

0-3 months

3-6 months

6-9 months

9-12 months

Lift their head while on their belly, tolerates being on their belly

Reach for a toy while on their belly; pushing up through straight arms while on belly

Able to move forward on their belly (commando crawl)

Able to play and crawl on hands and knees

Part 2 is suggestions for how to enourage Tummy Time!
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AUTHOR: customer
TITLE: Zipping 1-2-3!!
STATUS: publish
ALLOW COMMENTS: 1
ALLOW PINGS: 1
CATEGORY: Development
CATEGORY: Fine Motor Development
CATEGORY: Occupational Therapy

DATE: 1/27/2014 7:00:58 PM
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Zipping with Children Ages 3-4

Does your child struggle with completing his/her zipper on their coat, pants, book bag or boots? As a parent, do you find yourself completing the zipper on something your child is wearing?  Sometimes it is easier to complete the zipper for your child when rushing out the door to school, sports practice, or other activities! 

Completing a zipper independently is a task developmentally appropriate for a child starting at age 3.  Between the ages of 3 and 4 your child should demonstrate the following skills:

        ___3 years old, it is expected that a child can zip and unzip a jacket, pants, book bag or boots

        ___3.5 years old, developmentally, it is appropriate that a child be able insert, zip, and separate the two ends of a zipper on a jacket, coat or sweater

Often children have trouble zipping because of decreased strength in their fingers and hands, decreased eye-hand coordination, decreased visual-perceptual skills, limited movement in their hands, and decreased grasping skills.  Also, limited trunk strength may limit them from sitting upright to see the zipper. 

Activities that children can participate in to increase their performance with zipping include:


-squeezing silly putty or a squishy ball to increase strength
-picking out “treasures” hidden in silly putty or play-doh
-stringing beads to increase visual motor skills, visual-perceptual, and grasping skills
-picking up small items such as cheerios, raisons or puffs to increase pinching/grasping skills
-have your child lay on his/her belly during activities to increase trunk strength
-wheelbarrow walks to increase hand strength and movement in hands
-complete tasks with their hands in the center of their body such as stringing beads, clapping games which may include crossing the center of their body, and lacing

If you have questions about your child’s development, please contact an occupational therapist at ABC Pediatric Therapy Network at 513-755-6600.  We look forward to helping your child excel with their fine motor and self care skills!

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COMMENT:
AUTHOR: Greg
EMAIL: gcrecelius@cinci.rr.com
IP: 98.28.148.174
URL:
DATE: 5/5/2011 7:37:59 PM
Our children need to create a self of being. A lot of time children can not develop a sense of independence because things that are difficult for them are completed or solved by their caregivers.
Let’s help them become independent and confident.
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COMMENT:
AUTHOR: mindy
EMAIL: mkuchta@abcpediatrictherapy.com
IP: 208.102.1.188
URL:
DATE: 5/9/2011 5:29:29 PM
great ideas! It is so much easier to just do it for them sometimes.I have to remind myself to leave extra time so my daughter can learn to do these things herself. Besides she prefers to do things herself anyways. And whenever she does accomplish something like this she grins form ear to ear!!!I may have to get up a little earlier to get her out the door in the morning but her positive self esteem and ability to be independent is worth it! Thanks for the reminder!
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AUTHOR: customer
TITLE: Buttoning 1-2-3!!
STATUS: publish
ALLOW COMMENTS: 1
ALLOW PINGS: 1
CATEGORY: Development
CATEGORY: Fine Motor Development
CATEGORY: Occupational Therapy

DATE: 1/24/2014 4:21:20 PM
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How many
buttons can you count on the clothes you or your kids are wearing today? 
Buttons are everywhere! On raincoats, rain boots, sweaters, dresses, shirts,
and pants.

 

Starting
at the age of:

­­­___2.5
years old, it is age appropriate for kids to unbutton 1 large button

independently.

___3 years old,
developmentally, a child should be able to button a large

or medium button on
themselves independently.

___3.5 years old,
buttoning up to 3 or 4 buttons independently is

expected. 

 

As a
parent, do you find yourself completing your child’s buttons for them?  By
spending a few extra minutes helping your child who is at least 2.5 years old
to complete buttons will give them an increased feeling of accomplishment and
more independence with everyday tasks!

 

Often
children have trouble completing buttons because of decreased strength in their
fingers and hands, decreased eye-hand coordination, decreased visual-perceptual
skills, limited movement in their hands, and decreased grasping skills. 
Also, limited trunk strength may limit them from sitting upright to see the
buttons. 

Activities
that children can participate in to increase their performance with buttons
include:

·           
 Squeezing
silly putty or a squishy ball to increase strength

·      Picking
out “treasures” hidden in silly putty or play-doh

·      Stringing
beads to increase visual motor skills, visual-perceptual, and grasping skills

·      Picking
up small items such as cheerios, raisons or puffs to increase pinching/grasping
skills

·      Have your
child lay on his/her belly during activities to increase trunk strength

·      Wheelbarrow
walks to increase hand strength and movement in hands

 

If you have questions about your child’s
development, please contact an occupational therapist at ABC Pediatric Therapy
Network at 513-755-6600.  We look forward to helping your child excel with
their fine motor skills.


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AUTHOR: customer
TITLE: Identifying Sensory Integration Deficits – Lindsay Davidson
STATUS: publish
ALLOW COMMENTS: 1
ALLOW PINGS: 1
CATEGORY: Development
CATEGORY: Behavior

DATE: 1/22/2014 4:05:23 PM
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Below are some key considerations when trying to identify a
child’s level of sensory integration for the sensory areas of tactile,
vestibular, and proprioception/proprioceptive. Out of the 5 total sensory
integration areas, these 3 are the areas that most commonly work with, and
affect each other.  Any lack of
awareness, seeking of sensations, or avoiding a sensation can demonstrate a
deficit in sensory integration.

Tactile

Defensiveness or
Hyper-responsiveness to tactile input

Does the child…..

·       Object
to  being handled when not wearing
clothes

·       Struggle
against being held

·       Avoid
being messy when eating or with play items such as play-doh, sand, glue, paint,
or shaving cream

·       Object
to light touch applied with a cotton swab

·       Object
to having stickers applied to the skin

·       Startle
easily when being touched lightly or unexpectedly by others

·       Rub or
scratch a part of the body that has been touched

·       Push
the therapist’s  or others hand
away from his/her body

Poor tactile discrimination or
hypo-responsiveness

Does the child…

·       Fail to
recognize/respond to touch

·       Mouth
objects

·       enjoy
being held or hugged for longer periods of time

·       fail to
notice when the clothing is twisted on his/her body (decreased body awareness)

·       fail to
recognize when hands or face are messy

·       enjoy
toys that vibrate or have different textures such as bumpy, scratchy, fuzzy,
smooth

Proprioception/Proprioceptive

            Hypo-responsiveness
to proprioceptive input

            Does
the child…

·       bite or
chew on objects that are not food (clothing, toys..)

·       pinch
or hit others or self

·       lean
into the therapist’s hand during therapy treatment

·       fail to
adjust the body in response to changes in body position (decreased body
awareness)

·       grinds
teeth

·       high
tolerance for pain

·       toe
walking

·       seeks
heavy work activities including pushing, pulling, dragging, or jumping

Hyper-responsiveness to
proprioceptive input

Does the child…

·       cry
when having to bear weight in any position (laying on stomach, doing push-ups)

·       cry
when joints are moved

·       choose
not to move even if able to ( dislikes jumping, pushing, or pulling activities)

·       resist
against being held or hugged by familiar or unfamiliar people

·       under-reacts
to injuries

Vestibular

Hyper-responsiveness to gravity
or movement

·       object
to being moved backward in space even when the body and head are supported

·       express
fear/anxiety when placed on a large exercise/therapy ball

·       object
or distressed when feet are off ground during play or regular activities

·       fear/anxiety
of  swings, bouncing, or monkey
bars

·       dislike
sudden or quick movement

Hypo-responsiveness to movement

·       enjoys
movement activities such as rocking, spinning, or swinging more than others

·       seeks
opportunities to fall without regard to his or her safety

·       decreased
body awareness or change in body position

·       doesn’t
get dizzy when others do

Contact ABC Pediatric Therapy at (513) 755-6600 regarding
occupational therapy, or speak with your current
therapist if your child demonstrates with any characteristics mentioned in this
blog! 

Written by: Lindsay Davidson, MOT, OTR/L


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TITLE: Top Ten Fun Activities to Practice Speech Sounds at Home – by Christina Sanford
STATUS: publish
ALLOW COMMENTS: 1
ALLOW PINGS: 1
CATEGORY: Speech Therapy
CATEGORY: Parent Resources
CATEGORY: Speech/Language Skills
CATEGORY: Home program

DATE: 1/21/2014 3:50:04 PM
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  • Speech Sound Grab Bag: Fill a medium sized gift bag or tote bag with small objects/pictures that begin (or end) with the targeted sound. Have your child take out each object and practice saying that word and talk about what he/she found. Your child will love digging into the bag and feeling the objects inside to see what is hidden inside!    For example: /k/ sound objects could include keys, (pretend) cookie, cup, kit-kat bar, rubber duck     (quack-quack AND final /k/ in duck), book, ketchup packet, small stuffed animal cat, cork, can of soda or   coke, small cake candle, pretend slice of cake, napkin, plastic/toy fork, packet of hot cocoa
  • Flashlight Game: Get out a flashlight and place pictures or objects that target the speech sound and place them inside child’s bedroom or other room, turn off the lights and have the child shine the light around the room to “find” the objects. Your child will love playing with the flashlight and searching for the cards or objects.
  • Memory match up: Make small cards (with photos or clipart) with targeted speech sound so that you and your child can play the memory matching game. Place all cards face down and have your child see if they can remember where the cards are and whoever has the most matches wins the game.
  • Book Reading: Choose a book from your local library that targets the speech sound, read with your child (or maybe they can read to you!) You can find a complete book list for speech sounds here: http://blog.abcpediatrictherapy.com/2012/04/19/targeting-speech-sounds-by-reading-books—by-christina-sanford.aspx
  • Board Games: Incorporate your child’s favorite board game and upon taking a turn, have your child say a word 2-3 times targeting that speech sound (see if your child’s speech pathologist can give you a practice word list or photocopied pics). Game suggestions: Candyland, Chutes and Ladders, UNO, Guess Who?)
  • Sound guessing game: Practice “sound discrimination” at home by hiding your mouth with a piece of construction paper. Say a word that begins with the targeted sound (i.e. “seat”) and ask the child, “Did I say the /s/ or the /sh/ sound?” Choose words that rhyme but begin with the targeted speech sounds. (i.e. cake/take)
  • Build a “road” for cars: line picture cards for targeted speech sound face down, have your child help you build a “road” and turn over the cards as the car “drives’ along the road, saying the sound as the cards are turned over.
  • B-I-N-G-O: Use a bingo board and markers/chips that contain pictures of the targeted speech sound. This is a great way to include multiple family members!
  • Coloring: Use coloring sheets that include popular cartoon characters or scenes with targeted speech sounds. Sit with your child and have the child say one of the targeted words before receiving a crayon or marker to color a certain part of the coloring sheet. This way they are coloring as they are practicing the sounds.
  • Baking or Crafting: Have your child bake or put together a craft and target that sound during the activity. Examples of targeted words: cookies, cake, rolling pin, pat-pat-pat, push, cookie cutters, shapes, cook, bake, hot, mix, stir, egg, break, roll, pull, glue, stick/sticky, cut, in, out.

Written by: Christina Sanford, MA, CCC-SLP


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AUTHOR: customer
TITLE: Snow Day Yarn Activity!
STATUS: publish
ALLOW COMMENTS: 1
ALLOW PINGS: 1
CATEGORY: Development
CATEGORY: Fine Motor Development

DATE: 1/17/2014 5:49:38 PM
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Have kids at home stuck inside due to weather??..try a fun fine motor activity! Use sticky yarn or Wiki sticks to form the shapes of letters or numbers, great way to work on letter formation for writing as well as increasing fine motor skills!


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AUTHOR: customer
TITLE: Snow Day Fine Motor Fun! – by Laura Friedman
STATUS: publish
ALLOW COMMENTS: 1
ALLOW PINGS: 1
CATEGORY: Strength
CATEGORY: Fine Motor Development
CATEGORY: Occupational Therapy
CATEGORY: seasonal activities
CATEGORY: Development

DATE: 1/15/2014 3:24:17 PM
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Want to work on grip/finger strength in the snow? Fill up squirt guns or ketchup bottles or any plastic squirt bottles with water and add food coloring. Then make fun designs, pictures, numbers or letters in the snow!!

Written by: Laura Friedman, MS OTR/L


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TITLE: What Developmental Skills Should My Child Be Doing By 5 Years Old?
STATUS: publish
ALLOW COMMENTS: 1
ALLOW PINGS: 1
CATEGORY: Development

DATE: 1/14/2014 2:26:34 PM
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GROSS MOTOR SKILLS
*    Runs with good reciprocal arm swing and weightshift from 1 leg to the other
*    Jumps and turns 180 degrees and jumps forward 36 inches
*    Throws a large ball 10 feet with direction
*    Catches a large ball with elbows at sides from 6 feet
*    Stands on either foot for 10 seconds
*    Skips 8-10 steps with good coordination

FINE MOTOR SKILLS
*    Able to copy a couple of letters (usually first name)
*    Folds a piece of paper in half
*    Imitates more complex blocks designs
*    Cuts out a square

SELF HELP SKILLS
*    Makes overhand knot for shoes tying (ties at age 6)

SPEECH/LANGUAGE SKILLS
*    Uses a variety of sentences with 6 or more words
*    Has a vocabulary of 2000 or more words
*    Uses all speech sounds correctly
*    Is 100% intelligible to all listeners
*    Can describe objects and carry a plot when telling a story
*    Asks questions to get more information
*    Can follow multi-step directions without repetition

If your child cannot do most of the skills listed above, consult your pediatrician and consider getting a therapy evaluation.  A therapist can give you ideas of hwo to encourage development at home.

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TITLE: What Developmental Skills Should My Child Be Doing By 4 Years Old?
STATUS: publish
ALLOW COMMENTS: 1
ALLOW PINGS: 1
CATEGORY: Development

DATE: 1/10/2014 3:59:42 PM
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GROSS MOTOR SKILLS
*     Goes up and down steps without railing at least 4 steps alternating feet
*    Jumps forward 6 inches on 1 foot
*    Catches a large ball from 5 feet with elbows bent and a small ball from 5 feet with elbows bent
*    Throws a small ball 10 feet with direction
*    Stands on either foot for 6 seconds
*    Hops 8 consecutive times on each foot
*    Skips for 5 steps

FINE MOTOR SKILLS
*    Cuts out a circle
*    Holds a marker in a tripod grasp (adult looking)
*    Able to make a square and a cross (t)

SELF HELP SKILLS
*    Dresses self with occasional help, distinguishes front/back and inside out
*    Buckle belt and shoe
*    Buttons and unbuttons most buttons
*    Zips and unzips when zipper is in shaft
*    Snaps and unsnaps

SPEECH/LANGUAGE SKILLS
*    Uses 4-5 words sentences consistently, with good sentence structure
*    Is 100% intelligible to all listeners
*    Asks many questions including “Who?” and “Why?”
*    Has a vocabulary of 1500 or more words
*    Understands time concepts
*    Follow multi-step directions without repetition
*    Uses contractions (ie, can’t, don’t)
*    Begins to use complex sentences
*    Uses all speech sounds correctly

If your child is not doing most of the above skills, contact your pediatrician and consider getting a therapy evaluation.  A therapist can give you ideas of how to encourage develop at home.
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TITLE: What Developmental Skills Should My Child Be Doing By 3 Years Old?
STATUS: publish
ALLOW COMMENTS: 1
ALLOW PINGS: 1
CATEGORY: Development

DATE: 1/8/2014 3:49:23 PM
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GROSS MOTOR SKILLS
*    Jumps down 24 inches with both feet, jumps over 2 inch obstacle and jumps forward 24 inches
*    Throws ball with direction
*    Catches a large ball from 5 feet
*    Kicks a ball 6 feet with direction
*    Stands on 1 foot for 3 seconds
*    Hops 3 times on 1 foot
*    Rides a tricycle independently

FINE MOTOR SKILLS
*    Showing hand dominance
*    Strings small beads on a string
*    Draws a circle
*    Snips with scissors
*    Builds 8 cube tower

SELF HELP SKILLS
*    Washes hands
*    Independent with spoon and fork, little spilling
*    Drinks well from open cup, one hand
*    Removes and puts on pull over shirt
*    Removes shoes / puts on shoes
*    Unbuttons large buttons

SPEECH/LANGUAGE SKILLS
By 2 1/2 years old
*    Has approximately 450 word vocabulary
*    Gives first name
*    Answers “where” questions
*    Uses “no” or “not”
*    Uses 3-4 words utterances consistently
*    Identifies objects by function
*    Is 75% intelligible to all listeners
By 3 years old
*    Is 90% intelligible to all listeners
*    Converses in sentences
*    Has a vocabulary of 1000 words
*    Can tell a story and name one or more colors correctly
*    Follows prepositional commands and can follow 3 simple verbal commands
*    Asks questions
*    Responds to Wh- questions (who, what, when, where and why)

If your child cannot do most of the developmental skills listed, contact your pediatrician and consider getting a therapy evaluation.  A therapist can give you ideas on how to encourage development at home.
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TITLE: What Developmental Skills Should My Child Be Doing At 24 Months?
STATUS: publish
ALLOW COMMENTS: 1
ALLOW PINGS: 1
CATEGORY: Development

DATE: 1/6/2014 3:52:17 PM
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GROSS MOTOR SKILLS
*    Stoops to retrieve toy and returns to stand
*    Kicks ball
*    Jumps down off low surface, jumps forward
*    Goes up stairs without a rail placing both feet on each step

FINE MOTOR SKILLS
*    Imitates horizontal and vertical strokes
*    Can match 3 shapes
*    Builds 6 cube tower
*    Places simple puzzle pieces that match a formed shape

SELF HELP SKILLS
*    Can help pull up pants
*    Puts head through hole of shirt, finds armholes
*    Efficient spoon feeder, some difficulties with scooping still

SPEECH/LANGUAGE SKILLS
*    Has vocabulary of at least 100 words
*    Uses 2 words phrases on a regular basis
*    Uses some 2 word utterances
*    Uses some pronouns
*    Is at least 60% intelligible to all listeners
*    Follows 2 step related commands

If your child is not doing most of the skills above, consult your pediatrician and consider getting a therapy evaluation.  A therapist can give you ideas of how to encourage development at home.
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TITLE: What Developmental Skills Should My Child Be Doing By 18 Months?
STATUS: publish
ALLOW COMMENTS: 1
ALLOW PINGS: 1
CATEGORY: Development

DATE: 1/3/2014 3:25:20 PM
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GROSS MOTOR SKILLS
*    Walks independently (by 15 months)
*    Walks up and down 3-4 steps
*    Walks backward 5 steps and sideways 10 steps

FINE MOTOR SKILLS
*    Scribbles
*    Holds crayon with first finger and thumb directed towards paper
*    Matches 1-2 shapes
*    Builds 2 cube tower

SELF HELP SKILLS
*    Removes socks
*    Begins spoon feeding; dips in food and brings to mouth

SPEECH/LANGUAGE SKILLS
*    Uses 10-20 words including names
*    Combines 2 words and names at least 5 things
*    Responds to “yes/no” questions
*    Follows simple commands
*    Can identify body parts on self
*    Retrieves objects from another room when asked

If your child is not doing most of the above skills, contact your pediatrician and consider getting a therapy evaluation.  A therapist can give you ideas of how to encourage development at home.

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TITLE: What Developmental Skills Should My Child Have By 12 Months?
STATUS: publish
ALLOW COMMENTS: 1
ALLOW PINGS: 1
CATEGORY: Development

DATE: 1/2/2014 2:48:38 PM
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GROSS MOTOR SKILLS
*    Gets into and out of sitting
*    Cruises
*    Transitions sit to stand and stand to sit

FINE MOTOR SKILLS
*    Pincer grasp on small objects
*    Controlled release of objects
*    Combines 2 objects in 1 hand

SELF HELP
*    Finger feeds
*    Drinks from a spout cup with a lid

SPEECH/LANGUAGE SKILLS
*    Uses 3-5 words consistently, spontaneously and intelligibly
*    Imitates names of objects and non-speech sounds (ie, animal sounds)
*    “Talks” using long strings of jargon
*    Understands simple questions and begins to use some “yes/no” responses

If your child is not doing most of the above skills, please consult your pediatrician and consider getting a therapy evaluation.  A therapist can give you some ideas of how to encourage development at home.
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TITLE: What Developmental Skills Should My Child Be Doing By 9 Months of Age?
STATUS: publish
ALLOW COMMENTS: 1
ALLOW PINGS: 1
CATEGORY: Development

DATE: 12/30/2013 4:19:22 PM
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GROSS MOTOR SKILLS
*    Maintains sitting for 60 seconds with hands free to play
*    Crawling
*    Rolls back to belly and belly to back (log rolling)

FINE MOTOR SKILLS
*    Grasps smalls items using a scissor grasp
*    Grasping larger objects with radial-digital grasp (thumb opposed)
*    Active release of objects, not reflexive; needs surface for release
*    Bangs objects together

SELF HELP SKILLS
*    Holds own bottle
*    Self feeds cracker

SPEECH/LANGUAGE SKILLS
*    Waves in response to bye-bye
*    Responds to “no” most of the time
*    Vocalizes different syllables and two-syllable combinations (Ma-Ma, Da-Da)

If your child is not doing most of the above skills, please contact your pediatrician and consider getting a therapy evaluation.  A therapist can give you ideas of how to encourage development at home.
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TITLE: My child says a few words, how do I encourage more language?
STATUS: draft
ALLOW COMMENTS: 1
ALLOW PINGS: 1
CATEGORY: Speech/Language Skills

DATE: 12/30/2013 4:15:57 PM
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If your child is saying a few words, put those words to good use.  If he says “bubble” then talk about those bubbles! Make big ones, small ones, pop the bubbles, step on the bubbles, blow bubbles on your arms, legs, toes, etc. 


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TITLE: Fun Fine Motor Holiday Gift Ideas for Children
STATUS: publish
ALLOW COMMENTS: 1
ALLOW PINGS: 1
CATEGORY: Fine Motor Development
CATEGORY: Occupational Therapy

DATE: 12/23/2013 2:23:42 PM
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Here are some great toys that promote both fine motor and visual motor skills:

  • Kerplunk: Fine motor skills are promoted as children grasp the straws that hold up a handful of marbles. Visual motor skills are used to determine which straw should be pulled so that the least amount of marbles fall down.
    • Recommended for ages 5+
  • Fuzzoodles: Children are able to use their imaginations and have fun while using fine motor skills to build animals, people, or other creatures with the materials provided.
    • Recommended for ages 5+
  • Mazes: Promotes visual motor skills as children find their way from beginning to end.
    • Maze books are available for a variety of ages and skill levels.
  • Lite Brite: This is a great activity to encourage a pincer grasp on the small pieces and to promote eye hand coordination to create a pattern.
    • Recommended for ages 4-7
  • Building blocks are great for the younger crowd to promote grasp and eye hand coordination to build towers, bridges, and more!

Written by: Ann McCroskey MOT, OTR/L


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AUTHOR: customer
TITLE: Gift Ideas for Sensory Processing
STATUS: publish
ALLOW COMMENTS: 1
ALLOW PINGS: 1
CATEGORY: Sensory
CATEGORY: Occupational Therapy

DATE: 12/18/2013 4:38:21 PM
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The holidays are around the corner and will be here before we know it!  Here are some gift ideas for children with sensory processing challenges.  There are many types of sensory input that can be provided through the different avenues in the sensory system.  The gift ideas are organized into the different sensory systems and include items for different ages. 


Tactile

-Play dough, clay, or silly putty
-Moon sand
-Sand box
-Water table 
-Wikki stix
-Hand fidgets (such as a stress ball or koosh ball)
-Stretchy animals or toys

Auditory
-Kids CDs and child-friendly headphones
-Musical toys (symbols, drums, kids guitar, etc.)

Oral/Smell
-Chewelry (jewelry that you can chew to provide oral input)
-Fun, twisty straws
-Vibrating toothbrush
-Scented markers or stickers

Movement
-Swings
-Balance beam
-Hippity hop
-Scooter
-Bike/tricycle
-Collapsible tunnel
-Mini trampoline
-Twister
-Balls for sports (baseball, football, soccer ball, etc.)
-Jump rope
-Hula hoop

Visual
-Flashlights
-Kaleidoscope toys
-Hidden picture books
-Light bright
-Light up toys

 Written by: Hilary Lee, MPH, MS, OTR/L


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TITLE: Speech and Language Skills on Vacation – by Jessica Teepen
STATUS: publish
ALLOW COMMENTS: 1
ALLOW PINGS: 1
CATEGORY: Speech Therapy
CATEGORY: Speech/Language Skills
CATEGORY: Home program

DATE: 12/16/2013 10:28:31 PM
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Winter Break is a great time to take vacations.  Here are some fun ways to incorporate speech/language skills while on vacation!


Articulation:

  • Have the child talk about 3 things he/she did or wants to do on vacation using correct speech sounds
  • You can play games in the car (if traveling in a vehicle) like “I spy” or “Hang man” using correct speech sounds
  • Have the child label items (in the hotel, at the beach, at the pool) using his/her correct speech sounds

Language Activities:

  • Pronouns: have the child talk about what other people are doing at the beach, hotel, and swimming pool using correct pronouns (he, she, his, her)
  • Actions: have the child talk about what others are doing (e.g. throwing, running, swimming)
  • Past tense: have the child talk about what he or she did on the trip (e.g. “I swam in the pool”; “I splashed in the waves”)
  • Categories: have the child identify which group/category items go into
    • What group does a fish go into? (animals)
    • What group do sandals go into? (clothing)
    • What group does ice cream go into? (food)
    • What group does a bicycle go into? (transportation)
  • Negation/Negatives: have the child point items/people based upon embedded negation (e.g. “Which person is not in the pool?”)
  • Adjectives: have the child use describe items on vacation
    • Is the ice cream hot or cold?
    • Is the pool wet or dry?
    • Is the sand rough or smooth?
    • Is the pool deep or shallow?
    • Is the dolphin fast or slow?
  • Following Directions
    • Have the child follow simple 1-step directions (e.g. “Go get the ball”)
    • Have the child follow 2-step directions (e.g. “First put on your bathing suit then get your towel”)
    • Have the child follow 3+ step directions by completing an obstacle course using the pool/beach (e.g. “First jump in the pool, then give me a high-five, then go to the beach”)
  • “Wh-Questions”
    • Ask the child a variety of “wh” questions (e.g. what, where, when, why, how)
    • Examples:
      • “Who is throwing the ball?”
      • “Where is the dolphin swimming?”
      • “What is the boy making in the sand?”
      • “Why is the sand hot?”

Fluency Activities:

  • Have the child use his/her “slow and easy” speech to describe what is happening on the beach, at the pool, in the restaurant, etc.

Written by: Jessica Teepen MA, CCC-SLP


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TITLE: Fun visual motor activities for Kindergarteners – by Christy Mueller
STATUS: publish
ALLOW COMMENTS: 1
ALLOW PINGS: 1
CATEGORY: Fine Motor Development
CATEGORY: Occupational Therapy
CATEGORY: Visual Motor Skills

DATE: 12/12/2013 3:01:02 PM
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Stuck inside on a cold snowy winter day? Here are some visual motor activities that will help improve your child’s visual processing while keeping your kindergartener from getting bored

  • Complete a maze-search mazes on google or create your own. Have child start at the beginning and initially trace with their finger then complete using a marker or pencil
  • Dot-to-dots- can help improve scanning as well as help your child learn numbers and letters
  • Simple word search- allows your child to scan a set of letter which improves strength of eye muscles as well as helps to increase attention and focus
  • Hide and seek-hide several colorful balls or other objects around the house in areas where your child can see the object if they scan the environment. This helps with identifying objects from a background which improves visual processing
  • Hidden picture find- you can either have your child locate objects in a book or a hidden picture find. This also helps the child to separate objects from a background picture

Written by: Christy Mueller, MOT, OTR/L


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AUTHOR: customer
TITLE: Sensory Strategies for the Holidays
STATUS: publish
ALLOW COMMENTS: 1
ALLOW PINGS: 1
CATEGORY: Sensory
CATEGORY: Parent Resources
CATEGORY: Parenting
CATEGORY: Occupational Therapy
CATEGORY: Home program

DATE: 12/11/2013 4:19:34 PM
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The holidays are here and we are all very busy with family, shopping, and lots of events.  This time of year can be stressful and overwhelming for all of us, and can be particularly difficult for your child with sensory processing issues.  Below are strategies that can be helpful during this time of year.

-Use visual calendars and schedules to review with your child before events are happening.  This can help them to better prepare themselves for events and transitions.
-Allow your child to take a small toy, hand fidget, or other item that is comforting to them when visiting other places to assist them with self regulation.
-Before events or going places that might be overwhelming for your child, have your child participate in sensory activities that can provide them with sensory input.  Some ideas of activities are: animal walks (bear crawl, crab walk, frog jumps), wheelbarrow walking, slow rocking or swinging, make a “sandwich” with your child’s body (not head) between pillows, jumping on a trampoline, climbing activities. 
-Discuss strategies with your child  that they can use while visiting other places when they feel overwhelmed (going to a quiet room with mom or dad, go for walk outside with mom or dad, take a deep breath, etc.).


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TITLE: 10 Developmental Benefits of Book Reading – by Alyssa Miller and Christina Sanford
STATUS: publish
ALLOW COMMENTS: 1
ALLOW PINGS: 1
CATEGORY: Speech Therapy
CATEGORY: Speech/Language Skills
CATEGORY: Reading

DATE: 12/9/2013 3:50:32 PM
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  1. One on one interaction with your child!
  2. Pre-reading skills (how you hold a book, reading left to right, what words look like)
  3. Helps develop fine motor skills for turning pages
  4. Helps develop understanding of action words (running, swinging, eating)
  5. Teaches concepts of space (under, over, below, in)
  6. Increases your child’s vocabulary
  7. Many books promote rhyming skills (important for future reading and writing)
  8. Strengthens the relationship of listening and talking
  9. Helps your child learn what sounds the letters make
  10. Helps your child learn color, number and shape concepts!

 

If you have any questions about your child’s development please contact  Christina Sanford MA CCC-SLP csanford@abcpediatrictherapy.com or Alyssa Miller MS CCC-SLP amiller@abcpediatrictherapy.com 
513-755-6600


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AUTHOR: customer
TITLE: Co-Treatments at ABC
STATUS: publish
ALLOW COMMENTS: 1
ALLOW PINGS: 1
CATEGORY: Speech Therapy
CATEGORY: Physical Therapy
CATEGORY: Occupational Therapy

DATE: 12/6/2013 3:23:22 PM
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At ABC, therapists have the opportunity to recommend that therapy be structured as a regular therapy session or as a co-treatment.   Co-treatment sessions are those where a child is seen for two different therapies at the same time.  When a session is set up as a co-treatment there can be endless benefits. 

 

The benefits of co-treatments include:

  • Gives therapists the most time to work together “hands on” with your child
  • Many goals can be worked on at the same time with the same activity such as feeding, dressing, or gross motor activities
  • For example,  the occupational therapist may work on shoe tying while the speech therapist works on the language and sequencing of steps needed for shoe tying
  • Gives your child practice with many skills at one time which can help your child to be successful from the start to finish of a task
  • For example, if working on feeding the occupational therapist may help a child bring a spoon to their mouth while the speech therapist may help a child use their tongue and lips while eating
  • Gives therapists a chance to solve challenges for your child together
  • This may include an extra set of hands to help teach a child a skill or using a strategy to address a child’s behavior
  • Consistent flow of expectations
  • When therapists have similar expectations of your child and use similar language, interactions, and facial expressions it may help your child be more calm and productive
  • Incorporation of meaningful strategies for children who have sensory difficulties
  • An occupational therapist may be able to include sensory strategies while a child is completing tasks given by the speech therapist or physical therapist helping to increase attention and progress with their goals 

While co-treatments have many benefits they are not always the best option.  Co-treatments should be used to improve therapy not to decrease the time a child is in therapy for that day.  There are several factors to be considered when deciding whether a co-treatment is best.  If you have any questions about co-treatment therapy sessions please ask your child’s therapist and they will be happy to provide you with detailed information about their recommendation.


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AUTHOR: customer
TITLE: Holiday Fine Motor Activities for Kids – by Hilary Lee
STATUS: publish
ALLOW COMMENTS: 1
ALLOW PINGS: 1
CATEGORY: Fine Motor Development
CATEGORY: Occupational Therapy

DATE: 12/4/2013 3:34:35 PM
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Here are some fun fine motor activities you can do with your child on these cold and gloomy days to make fun decorations for the holidays!

Handprint Wreath: Have your child trace their hand and cut out about 10 of them (you can fold the paper over and cut out more than one at a time). Tape or glue the handprints together with the fingers facing outward. Cut out a red ribbon shape and tape/glue it to the bottom and decorate the wreath as desired using markers, glitter, puffy balls, etc.

Snowflake: Fold a white, square piece of paper multiple times and cut out small triangles and squares in various places on the folded paper. Open up the folded paper to see the snowflake and decorate. You can punch a hole at the top and use yarn to hang the snowflake up for decoration.

Stocking: Have the adult cut a stocking shape out of cardboard. The child then traces the stocking onto colored card stock or poster board and cuts it out. Have the child punch holes around the edges of the stocking, about an inch or two apart. Provide the child with a piece of yarn and have them wrap scotch tape around one end of it to make it more like a shoelace and easier to lace. Tie a knot in the other end of the yarn and have the child lace the yarn all around the outside of the stocking. Decorate.

Baking and Decorating Cookies: Have your child help with mixing the dough to improve hand and arm strength. Once the cookies are baked and cooled, spread frosting onto the cookies. You can then decorate them using sprinkles, icing to draw pictures, or any other fun way you want! Have your child pick up the small sprinkles and place them onto the frosting to work on fine motor coordination.

Written by: Hilary Lee, MPH, MS, OTR/L


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AUTHOR: customer
TITLE: Is Your Child A Picky Eater?
STATUS: publish
ALLOW COMMENTS: 1
ALLOW PINGS: 1
CATEGORY: Picky Eater
CATEGORY: Oral Motor
CATEGORY: Feeding
CATEGORY: Sensory
CATEGORY: Speech Therapy
CATEGORY: Occupational Therapy

DATE: 12/2/2013 3:22:44 PM
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Is your child a picky eater? Are mealtimes stressful? If so, there could be underlying problems rather than your child being difficult.  These problems can include oral motor skill development, motor-based, or sensory-based. Here are some sensory aspects to look at which may affect your child’s diet.  If you see a pattern in your child’s food choices, it may be beneficial to discuss these concerns with an occupational therapist or speech language pathologist.

Texture - does your child tolerate/not tolerate

  1. Crunchy foods

      2.    Soft foods

      3.    Purees

      4.    Chewy foods

      5.    Foods of multiple textures

Sightdoes your child tolerate/not tolerate

  1. Colorful foods

      2.    Plain foods

Smelldoes your child tolerate/not tolerate

  1. Strong smell

      2.    No smell

Taste - does your child tolerate/not tolerate

  1. Tasteful foods

      2.    Bland foods

Temperaturedoes your child tolerate/not tolerate

  1. Cold foods

      2.    Hot foods


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AUTHOR: customer
TITLE: Zipping with Children Ages 3-4 – by Lindsay Davidson
STATUS: publish
ALLOW COMMENTS: 1
ALLOW PINGS: 1
CATEGORY: Development
CATEGORY: Fine Motor Development
CATEGORY: Occupational Therapy

DATE: 11/22/2013 9:21:38 PM
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Does your child struggle with completing his/her zipper on
their coat, pants, book bag or boots? As a parent, do you find yourself
completing the zipper on something your child is wearing?  Sometimes it is easier to complete the
zipper for your child when rushing out the door to school, sports practice, or
other activities! 


Completing a zipper independently is a task developmentally
appropriate for a child starting at age 3.  Between the ages of 3 and 4 your child should demonstrate
the following skills:

___3 years old, it is expected that
a child can zip and unzip a

jacket, pants, book bag or boots

___3.5 years old, developmentally,
it is appropriate that a child

be able insert, zip, and separate
the two ends of a zipper on a jacket, coat or sweater

 

Often children have trouble zipping because of decreased
strength in their fingers and hands, decreased eye-hand coordination, decreased
visual-perceptual skills, limited movement in their hands, and decreased grasping
skills.  Also, limited trunk
strength may limit them from sitting upright to see the zipper. 

Activities that children can participate in to increase
their performance with zipping include:

-squeezing silly putty or a squishy ball to increase strength

-picking out “treasures” hidden in silly putty or play-doh

-stringing beads to increase visual motor skills, visual-perceptual,
and grasping skills

-picking up small items such as cheerios, raisons or puffs to increase
pinching/grasping skills

-have your child lay on his/her belly during activities to increase
trunk strength

-wheelbarrow walks to increase hand strength and movement in hands

-complete tasks with their hands in the center of their body such as
stringing beads, clapping games which may include crossing the center of their
body, and lacing

If you have questions about your child’s development, please contact an
occupational therapist at ABC Pediatric Therapy Network at 513-755-6600.  We look forward to helping your child
excel with their fine motor and self care skills!

By Lindsay Davidson, MOT, OTR/L

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AUTHOR: customer
TITLE: Buttoning 1-2-3! – by Lindsay Davidson
STATUS: publish
ALLOW COMMENTS: 1
ALLOW PINGS: 1
CATEGORY: Development
CATEGORY: Fine Motor Development
CATEGORY: Occupational Therapy

DATE: 11/20/2013 5:58:01 PM
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How many buttons can you count on the clothes you or your
kids are wearing today?  Buttons are
everywhere! On raincoats, rain boots, sweaters, dresses, shirts, and pants.

Starting at the age of:

­­­___2.5 years old, it is age appropriate for kids to unbutton 1 large
button

independently.

___3 years old, developmentally, a child should be able to button a
large

or medium button on themselves independently.

___3.5 years old, buttoning up to 3 or 4 buttons independently is

expected. 

As a parent, do you find yourself
completing your child’s buttons for them? 
By spending a few extra minutes helping your child who is at least 2.5
years old to complete buttons will give them an increased feeling of
accomplishment and more independence with everyday tasks!

Often children have trouble
completing buttons because of decreased strength in their fingers and hands,
decreased eye-hand coordination, decreased visual-perceptual skills, limited
movement in their hands, and decreased grasping skills.  Also, limited trunk strength may limit
them from sitting upright to see the buttons. 

Activities that children can participate in to increase
their performance with buttons include:

-squeezing silly putty or a squishy ball to increase strength

-picking out “treasures” hidden in silly putty or play-doh

-stringing beads to increase visual motor skills, visual-perceptual,
and grasping skills

-picking up small items such as cheerios, raisons or puffs to increase pinching/grasping
skills

-have your child lay on his/her belly during activities to increase
trunk strength

-wheelbarrow walks to increase hand strength and movement in hands

If you have questions about your
child’s development, please contact an occupational therapist at ABC Pediatric
Therapy Network at 513-755-6600. 
We look forward to helping your child excel with their fine motor
skills.

By Lindsay Davidson , MOT, OTR/L


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AUTHOR: customer
TITLE: Indoor Sensory Activities – by Hilary Lee
STATUS: publish
ALLOW COMMENTS: 1
ALLOW PINGS: 1
CATEGORY: Strength
CATEGORY: Occupational Therapy
CATEGORY: Sensory
CATEGORY: Home program

DATE: 11/19/2013 3:34:25 PM
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Now that the weather is turning on us, it will be difficult to make it out to the playground and outdoors.  This can have a negative effect on all of us, especially those that need additional sensory input in their day.  Below are some ideas of things you can do indoors to help provide sensory input for children: 

-create an indoor obstacle course
-jump on a mattress on the floor
-go on a scavenger hunt in the house
-animal walks – bear crawl, crab walk, frog jump
-wheelbarrow walk
-yoga poses
-build a fort with heavy cushions, blankets and pillows (then put it all away)
-help with chores (wiping the table, vacuuming, putting groceries away)
-cooking preparation activities (such as stirring or mixing dough with your hands) 
-roll your child up in a blanket (not covering the head) into a human burrito
-play flashlight games in the dark

Be creative and have fun through these colder months! 

By Hilary Lee, MS, OTR/L
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TITLE: Giving Directions and Setting Limits – by Lindsay Baker
STATUS: publish
ALLOW COMMENTS: 1
ALLOW PINGS: 1
CATEGORY: Behavior
CATEGORY: Home program
CATEGORY: Sequencing

DATE: 11/13/2013 5:50:16 PM
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Giving directions and setting limits for children can be a challenge.  Here are some helpful tips:

 

1. Commands should be short and to the point.

2. State positively, try to give “Do” commands rather than “don’t” commands (“Sit in your chair” vs. “Don’t get up”).

3. Include a transition or warning signal (“You have two more minutes to play, then it will be time to put your shoes on”). 

4. Avoid let’s, chain commands, and vague commands (“You need to finish putting the blocks on the shelf” vs. “Let’s clean up”).

5. Avoid questions (“Can you put your toys away? (NO!) ).

6. Remember to praise compliance. 

Written by: Lindsay Baker CCC-SLP


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AUTHOR: customer
TITLE: Fun Ways to Target Sequencing – By Jessica Teepen & Christina Sanford
STATUS: publish
ALLOW COMMENTS: 1
ALLOW PINGS: 1
CATEGORY: Speech Therapy
CATEGORY: Home program
CATEGORY: Speech/Language Skills
CATEGORY: Sequencing

DATE: 11/12/2013 6:39:56 PM
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Listed below are some great ways to target sequencing skills:

  • Create an obstacle course and have the child follow 2-3 step directions
  • Have the child describe basic routine events by telling what he or she did first, next and last (e.g. brushing teeth)
  • Have the child follow 2-step directions using “before” and “after”
  • Have the child participate in basic multistep events/tasks (e.g. making a pizza) and talk about the steps using “first, then, next, last”
    • Then have the child recall each step
  • Have the child sequence events of a story by recalling what happened in the beginning, middle and end
  • Have the child sequence events from a movie/television show by recalling what happened in the beginning, middle and end

Written By: Jessica Teepen, MA, CCC-SLP & Christina Sanford, MA, CCC-SLP


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AUTHOR: customer
TITLE: Tips to Building Phrases for Toddlers – by Christina Sanford
STATUS: publish
ALLOW COMMENTS: 1
ALLOW PINGS: 1
CATEGORY: Home program
CATEGORY: Speech/Language Skills
CATEGORY: Language

DATE: 11/8/2013 4:14:34 PM
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From 1 to 2, building phrases!

By the time a toddler has a vocabulary of at least 30-40 words, they begin to put words together into 2-word phrases (the child must be USING the 30-40 words in spontaneous speech to comment/request/label, not just imitating). The general “rule of thumb” is that at age one, children use only ONE word to communicate, then at age two, they use TWO words, by age three, they are using THREE or more words in sentences (requesting/commenting/asking & answering questions). I find myself using the following strategies right now with my 24-month-old and thought I’d share some ways to help increase the 2-word phrases in your toddler’s vocabulary.


1)     
One simple way is to build phrases using words your child already has in their vocabulary: Does your child have some functional words associated with mealtime, bedtime, playtime etc.??? Try adding MORE and PLEASE to those words. For example, “more juice”, “help please”, “out please”. “more crackers”, “up please”.

2)      Incorporate greetings to build phrases: “Hi daddy”, “bye-bye nana”

3)      Model phrases throughout your daily routines, commenting on what is happening or what your child is doing, “night-night baby”, “go out”, “want up?”, “purple ball”, the more these phrases are  modeled, the greater the chance your child will begin to imitate!

4)      Incorporate “automatic” phrases as well: For example, “I did it”, “this one”, “that one”, “my turn”, “let’s go”, “no mine”

5)      If you notice that your child isn’t quite catching on to 2-word phrase imitation, begin by repeating single words in a string, for example, “go-go-go!”, “up-up-up”, “night-night” to see how they respond.


Christina Sanford M.A. CCC-SLP


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TITLE: Teaching Pretend Play – by Christina Sanford
STATUS: publish
ALLOW COMMENTS: 1
ALLOW PINGS: 1
CATEGORY: Development
CATEGORY: Speech/Language Skills
CATEGORY: Home program

DATE: 11/6/2013 5:21:22 PM
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Pretend play is an important developmental milestone for toddlers.  Children learn through play, and as parents, you should encourage your child to use his/her imagination! Start by incorporating toys that they already have, rather than unfamiliar toys that they have not seen or may not know what to do with.
- For example: a bear, baby doll, spoon from your kitchen, plastic cup, toy vacuum, toy car, pots & pans, mom or dad’s shoes/dress clothes, old cell phone/toy phone, or even a cardboard box.

Model the pretend play with the familiar toys. Get down on the floor with your child and play! Children learn by watching. Have you ever seen your child pick up a lego block and move it across the floor pretending it is a car? Your child is actively using his/her imagination. Engaging in pretend play allows your child to learn how things work and develop what the appropriate use of objects is. Children can develop social skills, communication skills, and even life skills by achieving this important milestone!

Pretend play addresses the following developmental areas: Social Skills (cooperative play, turn-taking), Language Skills (helps your child connect spoken and written language, later helping them with reading!), Problem Solving Skills (figuring out how things work and what the function of objects are)

Written by:

Christina Sanford MA CCC-SLP

csanford@abcpediatrictherapy.com


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AUTHOR: customer
TITLE: Fun Ways to Target Language at the Grocery Store
STATUS: publish
ALLOW COMMENTS: 1
ALLOW PINGS: 1
CATEGORY: Speech Therapy
CATEGORY: Speech/Language Skills
CATEGORY: Home program

DATE: 11/5/2013 2:17:19 PM
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Categories:
-Have the child name vegetables, fruits, breakfast foods, chewy foods, crunchy foods, sweet foods, hot or cold foods.

Sound/Letter Identification:
-Before going to the grocery store, have your child help you make a list of the items you need. See if your child can help sound out the items (i.e. chips, you could ask “What does ‘chips’ start with?” Say the word slowly so they can hear the sounds. They could help you write the words on paper.
-Once you find whichever food to buy (i.e. carrots), discuss the sound they hear at the beginning of the word, or end of the word, (i.e. carrots, /k/ at the beginning)

Spatial Concepts:
-up on top, on the bottom, next to, behind, between, in front
For example: “Where is the cereal? Is it ‘up on top’ or ‘on the bottom’ shelf?”
-’out/in’ with putting items ‘in’ your cart or taking them ‘out’ when you are at the register

Quantity Concepts:
-Count the number of items you buy (i.e. “How many apples do we have?”)

Langauge is everywhere. I hope these ideas help!

Written by: Stacey Koenigsfeld MS/CCC-SLP


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AUTHOR: customer
TITLE: Tips to Getting a Haircut for the Sensory Defensive Child – by Hilary Lee
STATUS: publish
ALLOW COMMENTS: 1
ALLOW PINGS: 1
CATEGORY: Sensory
CATEGORY: Occupational Therapy

DATE: 11/1/2013 5:19:42 PM
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The process of getting a haircut can be a challenge for many children, particularly for those with sensory processing challenges (including tactile defensiveness).  Below are some suggestions to assist with these difficulties:  

-Call ahead of time and see what accomodations the salon can make for a child with sensory processing challenges (videos to watch, quiet music, low lighting, involving the child in the process to make it less scary).  Some children salons have certain times of day where they may cater to this.
-Visit the barber or salon and get a tour
-Bring a special “cape” they can wear instead of wearing the one at the salon
-Bring a hand fidget, something they can put in their mouth, and/or a weighted blanket to help provide them with calming sensory input
-If they are old enough, allow them to chew gum
-If they are afraid of the noise of hair clippers, bring headphones they can wear to listen to music
-Make a social story with pictures about getting a haircut
-Do some “heavy work” activities at home prior to getting a haircut.  Some examples are bear crawling, wheelbarrow walking, jumping into pillows, or giving big hugs.
-Watch a video of a child getting their haircut
-Increase hairbrushing at home
-Play “barber shop” or “beauty salon” at home and practice doing each other’s hair
-If getting to the barber or salon is not possible, see if a stylist can come to your home.

Written by: Hilary Lee, MPH, MS, OTR/L


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TITLE: Fine Motor Halloween Noodle Activity – by Christy Mueller
STATUS: publish
ALLOW COMMENTS: 1
ALLOW PINGS: 1
CATEGORY: seasonal activities
CATEGORY: Fine Motor Development
CATEGORY: Occupational Therapy

DATE: 10/30/2013 9:29:20 PM
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How to dye noodles in bright Halloween themed
colors to practice stringing:


In a large zip
loc bag combine ¼ cup rubbing alcohol, 10-12 drops of food coloring (black and
orange) and ½ box of pasta/noodles. Shake noodles in bag until all noodles are
covered let sit in bag for 2-3 hours, flipping them occasionally (the longer
they sit the darker/brighter the color) drain access liquid and lay noodles out
on cookie sheet to dry (do not place on paper towels or noodles with stick).
When noodles are completely dry have child string the noodles on black or
orange yarn! Stringing noodles is a great activity that encourages fine motor
development as well as hand eye coordination. The activity can be modified by
simply changing the shape or size of the noodle. If the child has trouble
stringing using yarn, try using a pipe cleaner!


Written by Christy
Mueller, MS, OTR/L


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AUTHOR: customer
TITLE: Physical Family Fun in the Forest – by Kim Colclasure
STATUS: publish
ALLOW COMMENTS: 1
ALLOW PINGS: 1
CATEGORY: Strength
CATEGORY: Physical Therapy
CATEGORY: seasonal activities

DATE: 10/28/2013 5:17:21 PM
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With the Fall season here, hiking is a fun family activity that can provide physical
challenges to strengthen your child. The natural inclines and declines found on most hiking trails
provide a great setting to strengthen the legs. The floor of the forest with tree roots and twigs
crossing the path lend an opportunity to challenge balance or play a game of "hopping over" the
root or branch. Fallen trees can be used as balance beams. Rocks or stumps can be used for
jumping skills. Bending down to squat and look at insects, rocks or in streams is another great way
to strengthen and stretch your muscles and joints. And the fine motor skills are endless when you
consider the many objects you can search for and find in a forest.





Written by: Kim Colclasure, PT, MPT



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AUTHOR: customer
TITLE: Fine Motor Activities for Halloween – by Christy Mueller
STATUS: publish
ALLOW COMMENTS: 1
ALLOW PINGS: 1
CATEGORY: Fine Motor Development
CATEGORY: Occupational Therapy

DATE: 10/25/2013 2:42:43 PM
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Here are some great Halloween fine motor activities to try out at home or at school:

  • Use tweezers, tongs, or children’s chop sticks to pick up spiders/Halloween rings and place in plastic pumpkin
  • Have child draw a pumpkin on orange construction paper then cut it out. Then practice drawing shapes on black construction paper (circles, Triangles, squares). Cut out the shapes and glue them onto the pumpkin to make a Jack-O-Lantern.
  • Look up on google “Halloween coloring pages” have child color the various pages. (Hint: If child is having trouble holding utensil with only 3 fingers (tripod grasp) and is age appropriate consider using a broken crayon to achieve a tripod grasp).
  • Use a pumpkin and either bean bags, spider rings or even just black and orange paper rolled into balls. Practice throwing the objects into the pumpkins
  • Placing Halloween stickers on paper in the shape of a pumpkin or other Halloween shape is a great way to encourage finger isolation and pincer grasp as well as hand eye coordination!

Writeen by Christy Mueller, MS, OTR/L


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AUTHOR: customer
TITLE: Tips to Make Halloween Enjoyable for Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders
STATUS: publish
ALLOW COMMENTS: 1
ALLOW PINGS: 1
CATEGORY: seasonal activities
CATEGORY: Occupational Therapy
CATEGORY: Sensory

DATE: 10/24/2013 4:18:02 PM
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The
very things that can be so exciting to neurotypical kids—wearing the costume of
a favorite character, being outside with other kids who also have on costumes,
knocking on doors to ask for treats, and getting treats from every house you
visit—can be anxiety producing for children with autism spectrum disorders.

Wearing
a costume is unfamiliar, as is going from house to house to ask for treats. New
routines and behaviors can be enjoyable for kids on the spectrum when they are
approached with planning, and the necessary supports are identified and
provided. Following are some things you can do ahead of time to help your child
enjoy this child-focused occasion:

1.
Begin early (even a month before) to prepare your child for Halloween
activities. Read a story about Halloween and the activities that surround it, like
carving pumpkins, wearing costumes, and trick-or-treating. Teach your child the
skills involved in participating—knocking on the door, holding out the bag,
saying “trick or treat” or using assistive technology (a picture or device) to
communicate the message, and then saying “thank you.”

2.
Help your child choose a costume that will reflect his interests. Let him
practice wearing the costume around the house while practicing the skills. If
wearing a costume is irritating, ask him if he would rather wear face paint, a
scarf, or a hat on Halloween. No costume is also OK.

3.
Write a social narrative describing what your child will do on Halloween.
Include in this story information about wearing the costume (if she will) or
face paint, and carrying the trick-or-treat bag. Identify which houses your
child will visit, what your child will say at each house, and what she will do
with the treats she receives.

4.
Create a visual schedule with the Halloween activities for the evening marked
on it.

5.
Let your child practice trick-or-treating with familiar individuals and houses.
If he has a restricted diet, give these individuals special treats for him.

6.
Keep the trick-or-treating session short and comfortable. If two houses are her
limit, that is fine.

7.
Teach your child to give out candy for trick-or-treaters. Use role play to let
him practice the skill before Halloween. Write a social narrative about this
aspect of Halloween so he will know what to expect and what to do when the
doorbell rings that evening. This way, even if his trick-or-treating session is
short, he will be involved in the celebration.

8.
Remember, practice helps make any activity feel like a routine!

From The Sphere
(Fall 2007-Volume I/Issue 2), newsletter of the Ohio Center for Autism and Low
Incidence. Reprinted with permission.


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AUTHOR: customer
TITLE: Using Books to Teach Speech and Language Skills – by Jessica Teepen
STATUS: publish
ALLOW COMMENTS: 1
ALLOW PINGS: 1
CATEGORY: Speech Therapy
CATEGORY: Speech/Language Skills
CATEGORY: Reading

DATE: 10/18/2013 1:44:55 PM
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Books can be a great, practical way to target speech and language skills. Listed below are some ideas to incorporate skills into joint storybook reading.


Articulation:

  • Have the child name pictures in the book that contain sounds you are working on (e.g. If the child is working on /s/ sound have them label pictures such as “sailboat, sun, boats, passing, etc.”)
  • If the child is able to read aloud have him or her read sentences/pages using correct sounds that he or she is working on
  • Have the child describe what is happening/going on in the pictures using correct sounds he or she is working on

Language Activities:

  • Pronouns: have the child talk about the male and female characters in the book using correct pronouns “he, she, his, hers, him, her”
  • Descriptions: have the child describe items within the book
    • Is the character nice or mean?
    • Is the fish water wet or dry?
    • Is the bear big or small?
  • Sequencing: have the child verbally (or with pictures) sequence events of the story using “beginning, middle and end”
  • “Wh-Questions”
    • Ask the child a variety of “wh” questions (e.g. what, where, when, why, how)
    • Examples:
      • “Who is the main character?”
      • “Where did the characters go?”
      • “What happened?”
      • “Why is the character sad?”
  • Inferences: have the child make a prediction of what will happen next or come to a conclusion
  • Rhyming: books with rhyming can allow the child to identify which words rhyme or make rhymes for words
  • Phonological Awareness
    • Multi-syllable words: you can break down multi-syllable (words containing 2, 3, 4+ syllables) words and have the child identify how many syllables/sounds are in the word (e.g. “tel-e-phone” has 3 syllables)
    • Blending: blend phonemes (letter sounds) together in words to see if the child can identify what the word is (e.g. “the sounds C-A-T make the word ____ [cat]”
    • Segmenting: have the child segment the phoneme sounds (letter sounds) in words (e.g. “what are all the sounds in the word ‘big’?” [B-I-G])

Fluency Activities:

  • Have the child use his/her “slow and easy” speech to describe what is going on in the pictures
  • Have the child discriminate between your “smooth” (speech without stuttering) and “bumpy” (speech with stuttering) reading voice while reading aloud

Voice:

  • If vocal abuse (e.g. screaming/straining voice) is an issue have the child practice using a “quiet” voice when talking about the story line or while reading aloud

Written by: Jessica Teepen MA, CCC-SLP 


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AUTHOR: customer
TITLE: Halloween Speech Therapy Activities – by Michelle Rosh
STATUS: publish
ALLOW COMMENTS: 1
ALLOW PINGS: 1
CATEGORY: Development
CATEGORY: seasonal activities
CATEGORY: Parent Resources
CATEGORY: Language
CATEGORY: Speech/Language Skills

DATE: 10/16/2013 3:05:08 PM
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Halloween is
just around the corner! This is a great opportunity to do some Halloween
activities while targeting speech!

·      Make a Halloween craft

-Work on following directions while making the craft (first cut the
scarecrow, then color it in)

-Talk about new vocabulary (pumpkin, scarecrow, ghost, etc.)

-Discuss colors and shapes

 

·      Read a Halloween book

-Discuss vocabulary

-Work on wh- questions (What do you wear on Halloween? Where do you go
trick-or-treating?)

 

·      Sorting candy

-Work on placing candy in piles by colors

-Work on the concepts “most” and “least” (Who has the most candy?)

-Work on counting (How many pieces of candy do you have?)

 

·      Make a social story

-The holidays can be overwhelming for some children, use a social story
to talk about the holiday and even include pictures!

-Talk about Halloween and dressing up in a costume

-Discuss what to say when going trick-or-treating

 

Fun Activities:

http://spoonful.com/crafts/spider-pops

http://www.babble.com/best-recipes/halloween-cake-pops/

http://www.pinterest.com/pin/78250112248889410/

http://spoonful.com/crafts/paper-plate-jack-o-lantern

Written by: Michelle Rosh, MS, CFY-SLP


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AUTHOR: customer
TITLE: Sensory Sensitive Halloween Tips for Children – by Hilary Lee
STATUS: publish
ALLOW COMMENTS: 1
ALLOW PINGS: 1
CATEGORY: seasonal activities
CATEGORY: Parent Resources
CATEGORY: Sensory
CATEGORY: Occupational Therapy

DATE: 10/14/2013 4:48:23 PM
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For a child with sensory processing challenges, Halloween can be a difficult time.  From wearing a costume that may feel itchy or scratchy, to the scary sights and sounds, to the crowds they may be around over Halloween.  Below are some tips to help make Halloween more enjoyable for the sensory sensitive child.

  • Have your child wear a costume made of material that feels good to them.  This may even just be a soft t-shirt with something ironed onto it.  If they do not want to wear a mask or paint on their face, then allow them to choose what they do and do not want to wear on their body.
  • Allow your child to bring some type of small security toy (small stuffed animal, squishy ball) that they can squeeze if they become overwhelmed. 
  • Allow your child to bring earplugs if they think they will be afraid of the noises around them.  Be sure you are with them so they are safe (since they may not be able to hear everything around them) if you put the earplugs in.
  • Do a trial run of trick or treating if your child is nervous about it.  Call a neighbor or family member where you can go and “practice” trick or treating. 
  • Only go to a few houses on Halloween night – try to gauge what you think your child can handle.  They may be able to handle a couple of houses at a time, and then may need to go home for a break before going to more houses. 
  • If they are going to be celebrating Halloween at school, find out from the teacher what exactly they will be doing so you can prepare your child for the events and they feel more comfortable.
  • Lastly, be sure to HAVE FUN!  Make the event fun for your child and not stressful. Listen to their needs and help them to feel more comfortable with Halloween.  This will also build their confidence in participating in these activities if they can feel successful and not as scared.

Hilary Lee, MS, OTR/L

Have a safe and happy Halloween!

 


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AUTHOR: customer
TITLE: Helping your child make the “k” and “g” sounds
STATUS: publish
ALLOW COMMENTS: 1
ALLOW PINGS: 1
CATEGORY: Speech Therapy
CATEGORY: Speech/Language Skills

DATE: 10/11/2013 3:43:17 PM
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Many children have difficulty producing ‘back’ sounds, /k/ and /g/.  These  sounds can be difficult because they are not visible for children to see.  The /k/ and /g/ sounds are produced by the back portion of the tongue lifting up and hitting the soft palate.  Typically, cues used are telling the child to ‘make your back sound’ and having the child touch their throat. 

The “ng” sound and high back vowels in particular are good to pair with /k/ and /g/.  Some words with “ng” are bank, bunk, pink, dunk, donkey, link, sink, tank, bongo, bingo, mango, finger, tango, lingo, and longer. 

Examples of words with high and mid back vowels are coat, comb, cone, cook, cookie, cool, could, ghost, goal, goat, good, and goose.  If a child is having difficulty with /k/ and /g/ those are some good words to try.

Written by: Lindsay Baker, MA, CF-SLP
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AUTHOR: customer
TITLE: Pencil Grasp Development – by Christy Mueller
STATUS: publish
ALLOW COMMENTS: 1
ALLOW PINGS: 1
CATEGORY: Development
CATEGORY: Fine Motor Development
CATEGORY: Occupational Therapy
CATEGORY: Handwriting

DATE: 10/9/2013 4:56:41 PM
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Poor handwriting can be the result of an immature pencil grasp that results from a decreased ability to isolate the fingers, decreased hand strength and /or decreased fine motor skills.


Development of Grasp


12 mo-18 months:
Children hold the writing utensil with a fisted grasp and thumb up


2 yrs-3 yrs
: Children hold the writing utensil with thumb down but fingers extended

3.5yrs -4 yrs
: Children hold the writing utensil with a mature three fingered grasp called a tripod grasp. At this age the arm moves as a whole and there is limited wrist movement

4.5 yrs-6 yrs
: Children continue with the tripod grasp however at this age the wrist begins to move and separate from the rest of the arm.

**If various other pencil grasps can be seen in children please consult with an occupational therapist to determine a functional grasp for your child**


Importance of Finger Isolation and Pencil Grasp

In order to develop a mature pencil grasp, children need the ability to isolate each one of their fingers. Children should be able to tell you how old they are on their fingers. For example, a one year old should be able to hold up their index finger. For a two year old, they should be able to hold up index and middle finger and so on.


Activities for Developing Finger Isolation

  • Using tongs, chop sticks, or tweezrs to pick up smaller items like beads and little figurines
  • Finding beads in Playdoh
  • Stringing beads
  • Playing a small piano or keyboard
  • Typing

Written by Christy Mueller, MOT, OTR/L


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TITLE: Fine Motor Halloween Noodle Activity
STATUS: publish
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DATE: 10/7/2013 3:03:19 PM
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How to dye noodles in bright Halloween themed colors to practice stringing:

In a large zip loc bag combine ¼ cup rubbing alcohol, 10-12 drops of food coloring (black and orange) and ½ box of cooked pasta/noodles. Shake noodles in bag until all noodles are covered let sit in bag for 2-3 hours, flipping them occasionally (the longer they sit the darker/brighter the color) drain excess liquid and lay noodles out on cookie sheet to dry (do not place on paper towels or noodles with stick). When noodles are completely dry have child string the noodles on black or orange yarn! Stringing noodles is a great activity that encourages fine motor development and well as hand eye coordination. The activity can be modified by simply changing the shape or size of the noodle. If the child has trouble stringing using yarn, try using a pipe cleaner!


Written by Christy Mueller, MS, OTR/L

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AUTHOR: customer
TITLE: My Toddler is talking, but I can’t always understand him! – by Christina Sanford
STATUS: publish
ALLOW COMMENTS: 1
ALLOW PINGS: 1
CATEGORY: Speech Therapy
CATEGORY: Speech/Language Skills
CATEGORY: Language

DATE: 10/4/2013 5:41:13 PM
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So your little one has
reached an important developmental milestone and is communicating, and you as a
parent know what he is saying, but grandma keeps saying “I don’t know what she
just said!”… Sound familiar??? What exactly IS typical for your two-year-old
chatterbox? Here is a list of “milestones” regarding speech intelligibility!

A phonological process disorder involves patterns of sound
errors. For example, substituting all sounds made in the back of the mouth like
“k” and “g” for those in the front of the mouth like
“t” and “d” (e.g., saying “tup” for
“cup” or “das” for “gas”). As you will see below,
some of these are typical for a toddler, but do need to disappear by age 3.

Another rule of speech is
that some words start with two consonants, such as broken or spoon. When
children don’t follow this rule and say only one of the sounds
(“boken” for broken or “poon” for spoon), it is more
difficult for the listener to understand the child. While it is common for
young children learning speech to leave one of the sounds out of the word, it
is not expected as a child gets older.
If a child continues to demonstrate such cluster reduction, he or she may have
a phonological process disorder. (ASHA.org)

Here is a list of phonological (speech patterns) and
when they “disappear” in typical speech sound development!

These
processes disappear by age 3:

1)       Deletion
of a final consonant sound: i.e. “cah”/cat

2)       Omission
of a weak syllable (i.e. “nana”/banana)

3)       Addition
of “i” at end of nouns (i.e. “doggie”)

4)       Substitution
of front sound for a back sound (i.e. “tar”/car)

5)       Repetition
of syllables or sounds (i.e. “baba”/bottle)

6)       Substitution
of a voiced consonant for an unvoiced consonant before a vowel (i.e. “zun”/sun)

 

 

Speech
Intelligibility Guidelines:

19-24 months: 25-50% intelligible

2-3 years: 50-75% intelligible

 

Speech Sound
Development for Toddlers:

By
24 months
 

Initial
Sounds – /p, b, m, t, n, d, h, k, g/ and Final
Sounds – /p, m, n/

Produces
Most Vowel Sounds Correctly and at least 6-8 different consonant sounds.

By
28 months
 

Initial
Sounds – /d, f/ and “y” and Final Sounds – /s,
d, k, f/ and “ng” 

By
32 months
 

Initial
Sounds – /w/ and Final Sounds  - /t, b, r/

By
36 months  (age 3)–

Initial
Sounds – /s/ and Final Sounds – /l, g/ and
“er” endings

 

If you are concerned with your little one’s speech
intelligibility, discuss these concerns with your pediatrician. For more
information regarding your child’s speech sound development, feel free to email
me at csanford@abcpediatrictherapy.com
(Christina Sanford MA CCC-SLP)


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TITLE: Great Ways to Elicit Language While Playing Cars – by Terri Smock
STATUS: publish
ALLOW COMMENTS: 1
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CATEGORY: Speech Therapy
CATEGORY: Speech/Language Skills
CATEGORY: Language

DATE: 10/2/2013 8:49:57 PM
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  • Requesting: Hold the cars in a container that cannot be opened. Require your child to use one, two or three word combinations to request cars (“cars”, “cars please”, “I want cars”).
  • Labeling: Be specific when labeling cars. Identify the difference between “car”, “truck”, “bike”, “bus” etc.
  • Action words: Model words such as “driving” and “riding” while making cars move.
  • Describing words: Make cars drive on “smooth” and “bumpy” surfaces. Describe the surfaces as you play. Talk about the colors of the cars and whether they are “big” or “little”.
  • Answering “wh” questions: Ask your child questions as they are playing such as “Who is driving”, “where are they going?”, “when does the school bus come and get us?”,  or “why doesn’t this car work?”.
  • Location concepts: Make cars go “on, in, under, around, up, down, in front, behind” things and ask your child where they are. Or talk about where your child’s car is going as they are driving it. “Look your car is going up the hill and under the bridge”.
  • Imitating environmental noises: Model noises such as “beep beep”, “vroom”, “whoo whoo” to attempt to elicit early sounds and imitation.
  • Fluency: talk about fast and slow and relate it to fast and slow speech. Talk about smooth and bumpy and relate it to smooth and bumpy speech.
  • Labeling parts: Label the wheels, window, door etc. on the car.
  • Imitating: Attempt to elicit imitation of moving the cars. Play “ready set go” games and make the cars drive.
  • Turn taking: sit across from your child and drive a car to them. Then request that they drive the car back to you. Play a back and forth game where the car is driven between you can your child. Have your child wait for the car to come to them.

 


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AUTHOR: customer
TITLE: Fun Fall Craft – by Hilary Lee
STATUS: publish
ALLOW COMMENTS: 1
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CATEGORY: seasonal activities
CATEGORY: Fine Motor Development
CATEGORY: Occupational Therapy

DATE: 9/30/2013 4:35:05 PM
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Fall tree cutting activity:


-Cut a tree trunk and branches (different sizes of rectangles) out of brown construction paper and glue it onto another piece of construction paper (you can use blue for the sky or any other color you choose)
-Cut a strip of green paper and glue it under to bottom of the tree for grass
-Cut out strips of red, orange, and yellow paper
-Cut the strips into small squares for the leaves of the tree
-Scrunch the square pieces and glue them on the branches, the grass and the paper as leaves falling from the tree

Hang it up on the refridgerator or around the house for fall decoration!


By Hilary Lee, MPH, MS, OTR/L

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AUTHOR: customer
TITLE: Why Can’t My Child Do It? It’s Just Writing!
STATUS: publish
ALLOW COMMENTS: 1
ALLOW PINGS: 1
CATEGORY: Fine Motor Development
CATEGORY: Occupational Therapy
CATEGORY: Handwriting

DATE: 9/25/2013 4:31:19 PM
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Children become very good hand writers by developing muscle strength, problem solving skills and eye hand coordination.  A child who does not have the necessary skills that are developed before handwriting (i.e. arm strength, eye-hand coordination, letter and shape perception) will eventually struggle to complete such tasks at school and home. 

The following problems may be present in a child who has difficulty with handwriting:

 

Limitations in trunk movement and control

Poor use of both arms/crossing the middle of the body

Limitations in range of motion (ROM), strength, and muscle tone of the hand and wrist

Poorly graded movements (control of the speed of movement)

Limitations in the ability to smoothly form basic strokes such as circles and lines

Difficulty with letter perception (recognition of forms, similarities and differences)

Challenges with visual-motor integration (using eyes and hands together)

Difficulty orienting to printed language (letter/word/sentence formation)

Challenges with position in space (knowing where you are in space)

 

Challenges with handwriting may impact child’s life in more than one area.  The child may fall with their grades and begin to act out within the classroom and  at home.  This “acting out” may be used to avoid the challenge handwriting tasks present to the child.  He or she may also struggle with lower self-esteem because he/she may not feel confident in comparison to his or her friends.

 

Occupational therapists work with the child and family in order to develop handwriting skills.  The goal of therapy is to maximize the child’s skill level and facilitate that use of effective strategies to minimize frustration and increase accuracy.  OT’s are able to target each and every problem area associated with poor handwriting and integrate these skills into play-based therapy activities that will strengthen the child’s deficulties and improve their handwriting.

***Handwriting Tip: When learning letters, have a child form the letters with play-dough instead of writing it. Not only is it more fun for them, but it also develops fine motor skills needed for proper handwriting. ***

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AUTHOR: customer
TITLE: Oral Motor Home Program Feeding Tip #5
STATUS: publish
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CATEGORY: Development
CATEGORY: Speech Therapy

DATE: 9/24/2013 12:10:01 AM
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Just like a child needs to progress from using his/her fingers for eating to using a utensil, the child also needs to progress from a bottle to a cup.

Encourage variety with drinking.  Use sippy cups, juice boxes, sports bottles and open cups. 

Consider using a sports bottle rather than a sippy cup when out of the house for more mature patterns of drinking.  Give your child water in their sports bottle so spills are not a concern.

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TITLE: Oral Motor Home Program Tip #4
STATUS: publish
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CATEGORY: Development
CATEGORY: Speech Therapy

DATE: 9/19/2013 1:49:15 PM
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How can I encourage less food loss from the front of my child’s mouth?

  • Using a vibrating toothbrush or lollipops on the lateral incisors (the teeth right in front of your child’s pointy teeth) to encourage side to side movement of the tongue prior to eating
  •  Place the lollipop or toothbrush at the right lateral incisor and encourage tongue movement to the right side 5-8 times
  • Repeat this technque on the left lateral incisor as well
  • The vibration and/or sweet flavor of the lollipop will make the tongue want to go to that side (our tongue naturally wants to go to whatever is placed in our mouth i.e. think about how your have to focus to keep your tongue away from the tools when the dental hygienist is cleaning your teeth)
  • The heightened sensation of the vibration and or sweet/sour flavor will encourage tongue movement even more


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AUTHOR: customer
TITLE: Oral Motor Feeding Home Program Tip #3
STATUS: publish
ALLOW COMMENTS: 1
ALLOW PINGS: 1
CATEGORY: Speech Therapy
CATEGORY: Picky Eater
CATEGORY: Development

DATE: 9/17/2013 5:23:15 PM
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Offer your child licorice, pretzel rods, popsicle sticks and/or straws and play a bite and tug game to establish jaw strength, stability and independent movement of the tongue and jaw.

Why does you child need jaw strength, stability and independent movement of the tongue and jaw?

Just like your body needs trunk strength and stability for your arms to work well, your jaw needs to be able to move up/down and in a circle for your tongue and lips to work well.

The tongue is just like all othe muscles in your body.
It must have the correct length and strength to provide the fine motor movements speech requires.  The tongue also requires support and stability from the jaw in order to work well.

So, if the jaw is not stable (good range and movement) then the lips and tongue will be effected.

This will effect the maturity of feeding.  The jaw pattern will remaim munch like (up and down) and will not progress to a rotary pattern needed for more mature foods.

Not have a stable jaw will also effect letter sound develoment.
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AUTHOR: customer
TITLE: Oral Motor Feeding Home Program Tip #2
STATUS: publish
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CATEGORY: Speech Therapy
CATEGORY: Picky Eater
CATEGORY: Development

DATE: 9/13/2013 3:22:09 PM
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Offer your child chewy foods (i.e. bubble gum, laffy taffy, starburst, dried fruit) as chewing these types of food will help to establish jaw strength.

  • This will help with developing a more mature chew, encouraging tongue retraction, and help with sound development (for sounds that require jaw strength)!!
    • a mature chew pattern is the ability to chew with your lips closed having a circular movement patern with your jaw moving the food from side to side in your mouth until it is ready to swallow
    • tongue retraction is the ability to keep your tongue within your mouth, behind your lips and teeth

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AUTHOR: mindy kuchta
EMAIL:
IP: 208.102.1.188
URL:
DATE: 9/7/2011 3:19:40 PM
Chewy foods also have the added benefit of being calming to kids. The chewing motion and the muscles involved in the process of chewing relax the body.
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AUTHOR: customer
TITLE: Oral Motor and Feeding Home Program Tip #1
STATUS: publish
ALLOW COMMENTS: 1
ALLOW PINGS: 1
CATEGORY: Development
CATEGORY: Speech Therapy

DATE: 9/11/2013 3:58:08 PM
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To help your child to close his/her lips around a spoon to clean the food off the spoon:

Have your child blow on a harmonica to encourage lip activation for spoon feeding

  • Many children have difficulty using their upper lip to remove food from a spoon, and using the harmonica prior to eating off a spoon will encourage this movement
  • This will also encourage lip closure, which can prevent food loss out of the front of the mouth

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AUTHOR: customer
TITLE: Sensory Tips For The Classroom by: Jessi Coghill
STATUS: publish
ALLOW COMMENTS: 1
ALLOW PINGS: 1
CATEGORY: Fine Motor Development
CATEGORY: Behavior
CATEGORY: Parent Resources
CATEGORY: Sensory
CATEGORY: Handwriting
CATEGORY: Development
CATEGORY: Occupational Therapy

DATE: 9/9/2013 9:20:21 PM
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  • Provide lined paper for writing assignments.
  • Provide pencil grippers for children who have trouble using a mature pencil grasp.
  • Remind children to use their non-dominant hand to hold the paper.
  • Adjust chairs and tables to the proper height for each child. (Feet should touch the floor. Table height should be just below the child’s elbow when the fist rests under the chin.)
  • Keep visual and auditory distractions to a minimum.
  • If a child presses too hard on the pencil, give him a mechanical pencil.
  • Always present information in the child’s best modality. Visual, auditory, or multi-sensory learning activities can facilitate understanding and memory.
  • Use graph paper to help organize math problems.

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AUTHOR: customer
TITLE: 5 Year Old Fine Motor Child Development
STATUS: publish
ALLOW COMMENTS: 1
ALLOW PINGS: 1
CATEGORY: Development
CATEGORY: Fine Motor Development
CATEGORY: Occupational Therapy

DATE: 9/6/2013 3:34:51 PM
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Fun with Tying Shoes!

Your child will gain a great amount of confidence when they can tie their shoes on their own! 

Modeling how to tie your shoes is a great way to help your child develop this important skill.  Your child may feel greater control over their practice if they place a sticker on the calendar for each day they tie their own shoes!  Encourage older siblings to help teach your child how to tie their shoes as well.  Playing dress up or dressing as super heros can provide a great time for your child to practice their shoe tying skills.  Occupational therapy can help your child increase their visual perceptual skills and fine motor strength in order for them to become independent in shoe tying!

From the age of 5 until they turn 6 years old, the following are the skills your child should attain:

____Tie shoes.                                  ____Copy a triangle.

____Cut out a circle.                         ____Draw a person with 6 or more different parts.

____Read and write numbers 1-5.    ____Trace letters.

____Complete coordinated jumping jacks.

____Complete a curved and jagged maze a 1/4 an inch wide.

If you have questions about your child’s development, please contact an occupational therapist at ABC Pediatric Therapy Network at 513-755-6600.  We look forward to helping your child excel with their fine motor skills.

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TITLE: 4 Year Old Fine Motor Child Development
STATUS: publish
ALLOW COMMENTS: 1
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CATEGORY: Development
CATEGORY: Fine Motor Development
CATEGORY: Occupational Therapy
CATEGORY: Sensory

DATE: 9/5/2013 8:54:43 PM
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Sensory Play!    

Using a variety of materials for fine motor activities increases your child’s memory of how to complete the task.  Use finger paint or side walk chalk to draw squares and complete Connect-The-Dot activities.  Get out the Play-doh and cookie cutters and make patterns based on colors or shapes!  String colored cereal pieces in a pattern and make a bracelet!  Encourage your child to trace their hand and then color and draw faces to make the hands look like silly animals!  Consider how much fun this can be when you invite friends over to model the tasks and motivate your child! 

From the age of 3 until they turn 4 years old, the following are the skills your child should attain:

____Demonstrate hand dominance.                                       ____Trace around own hand.

____Sort objects by color, shape and size.                            ____Copy a square.

____String small beads to create a set pattern.   

____Cut out a small square and triangle with pre-drawn lines.

If you have questions about your child’s development, please contact an occupational therapist at ABC Pediatric Therapy Network at 513-755-6600.  We look forward to helping your child excel with their fine motor skills.

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AUTHOR: customer
TITLE: 3 Year Old Fine Motor Child Development
STATUS: publish
ALLOW COMMENTS: 1
ALLOW PINGS: 1
CATEGORY: Development
CATEGORY: Fine Motor Development
CATEGORY: Occupational Therapy

DATE: 9/3/2013 10:12:20 PM
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When Your Child Has Difficulty Adjusting From One Activity to the Next!

Motivating your child to move from one activity to the next can be challenging.  Some things that can help are to use a timer and remind your child when they have 5 minutes until it will be time to get in the car.  Another way to help your child transition is to discuss with your child what they are doing now and what will be happening next with counting: “This is so much fun to play in the sand box, but let’s count to 10 and then we can go sit at the dinner table!  One… Two…”  Sometimes a picture schedule can help children understand what is expected of them.  Show them the pictures as you talk about the coming activities.  “First we will go to the park, then we will take a nap, then your brother will get back from school and we can all have dinner!” 
 

From the age of 3 until they turn 4 years old, the following are the skills your child should attain:

____Copy a circle and cross and trace a square.           ____Cut along a curved line.

____Make a bridge with 3 blocks.                                   ____Unbutton clothing.

____Wipe around nose with a tissue when reminded.    ____Put shoes and socks on.

____Push arms into sleeves and pull clothing to shoulders.

     ____Use a fork to stab food.

If you have questions about your child’s development, please contact an occupational therapist at ABC Pediatric Therapy Network at 513-755-6600.  We look forward to helping your child excel with their fine motor skills.

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AUTHOR: customer
TITLE: Is My Child Ready To Potty Train?
STATUS: publish
ALLOW COMMENTS: 1
ALLOW PINGS: 1
CATEGORY: Development
CATEGORY: Occupational Therapy
CATEGORY: Home program

DATE: 8/30/2013 9:17:58 PM
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Characteristics to address when planning toilet training:

  • Communication needs
  • Sensory awareness
  • Readiness
  • Preference for routine or ritual
  • Sequential learning
  • Motor planning
  • New situations/Anxiety

Addressing toilet training at school:

  • Parents and teachers work as a team
  • Share techniques in certain situations and experiences
  • Support one another’s efforts
  • Address equipment needs

Determining Readiness:

  • Answering yes to any of these questions may indicate an appropriate level of awareness for initiating toilet training
    • Does the child act differently or seem to notice when diapers or clothing are wet or soiled?
    • Is there any interest or difference in behavior related to the bathroom, toilet, handwashing, dressing, undressing, or other related tasks?
    • Has any interest or change in behavior been shown in response to seeing other people involved in activities or with objects related to toileting?
    • Can the child remain dry or unsoiled during naps?
  • An indicator of physical readiness for bowel training is regular bowel movements and no soiling during sleep.
  • The physical ability to sit and hold one’s body in a upright position
  • Basic cooperation with undressing related to toileting, in order to minimize agitation immediately prior to attempting to eliminate
  • Freedom from medical conditions that contraindicate participation in toileting program
  • Avoid postponing toilet training when an individual shows other signs of readiness, but does not remain dry for 1-2 hour periods or during naps.

Example: Jane was 4 years old.  She enjoyed sipping juice throughout the day causing mom to frequently change her diaper.  Mom then began giving Jane juice for 10 minute periods at a time, resulting in Jane voiding on a predictable schedule and a successful toileting program!

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AUTHOR: customer
TITLE: Everyone Goes! How To Potty Train Your Child!
STATUS: publish
ALLOW COMMENTS: 1
ALLOW PINGS: 1
CATEGORY: Development
CATEGORY: Parent Resources
CATEGORY: Parenting
CATEGORY: Occupational Therapy

DATE: 8/19/2013 9:14:55 PM
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                                        Everyone Goes!

Toilet Training Tips for Parents

A key fact when considering toileting training is the long-term impact of toilet training on the family’s independence, resources, interactions and social acceptance. The time and effort invested in toilet training is temporary.  

  • Toilet training should not begin before age 18 months
  • It becomes a priority if child is over 4 years old
  • Most children need to be continent or exposed to habit training* before they are 5-6 years old.

*habit training- child is taught to eliminate on toilet at certain times of the day, opposed to eliminating when one is physically aware of the need to eliminate

Importance of Toilet Training:

  • Personal care needs are one of the most important skills a person can learn
  • Cleaning up wet and soiled clothing takes time, energy and resources
  • Incontinence interferences with social acceptance
  • Impacts home, family, community and school
  • Embarrassment
  • Stress
  • Finances
  • Jobs
  • Social lives
  • Physical demand
  • Increased attention to child being trained

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AUTHOR: customer
TITLE: Individual Education Programs (IEPs)
STATUS: publish
ALLOW COMMENTS: 1
ALLOW PINGS: 1
CATEGORY: Development
CATEGORY: Parent Resources

DATE: 8/16/2013 7:31:28 PM
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Individualized Educational Plans (IEP)

What is an IEP?

It is a plan that is developed to support children in the school environment who have been identified as eligible for special education services

How does my child become eligible?

A child is considered eligible under the individuals with disabilities act or IDEA.  The determination on eligibility is based on whether or not the student’s physical or emotional challenges have an adverse effect upon the student’s ability to learn.

What should be in an IEP?

A plan that entitles a child to a free and appropriate public education that includes specific goals, objectives, related services when necessary,  how the services will be provided(least restrictive environment), how often , and how the progress towards the objectives will be measured.

What is LRE?

LRE stands for least restrictive environment.  This is individually based per child.  This is the environment that is the most like a typical learning experience as possible but still enables the child to be successful.

What should parents know before the IEP meeting?

It is beneficial to know what the law says about the IEP process. Districts’ have a duty to provide this information to parents. They also are required to provide families with an explanation of their rights and a list of special education support services.

How do I know the IEP will be followed?

An IEP is a legally binding document. A district can be fined if they do not follow the IEP that has been developed and signed off on.

Does an IEP guarantee that my child will be successful?

There are no absolute guarantees that a child will meet the goals or a certain level specified by the IEP.  However there must be every attempt to meet the goals.   When a goal has not been achieved there should be specific information that supports why the goal was not reached.  The initial plan must contain every resource possible to make the child’s educational experience as positive and successful as possible.

What if my school does not have the resources to provide the service?

This does not happen often. When it does most districts would independently seek the resources needed to fulfill the IEP plan.  Districts are given federal funding per IDEA and would jeopardize their funding if they did not comply.

What does the ideal IEP look like?

Ideal IEP’s should include classroom setting, related services, strategies needed, and how peers will be involved.  They should be individualized and unique to each child and not loaded with numbers and goals.  The parent’s concerns and goals should always be included  in the plan.

Who can be my advocate?

Parents need to be advocates for their children. Teachers continue to be asked to do more and more and need the support from parents.  Private providers can also assist families in understanding, reviewing, and revising IEP’s.

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AUTHOR: customer
TITLE: 5 Great Reasons Your Child Should Practice Mazes at Home- by Laura Friedman
STATUS: publish
ALLOW COMMENTS: 1
ALLOW PINGS: 1
CATEGORY: Fine Motor Development
CATEGORY: Visual Motor Skills
CATEGORY: seasonal activities
CATEGORY: Sequencing
CATEGORY: Development
CATEGORY: Occupational Therapy

DATE: 8/13/2013 2:58:41 PM
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Mazes are a big hit with
therapist, and kids love them too! 
Mazes are not only fun and interesting they provide your child’s
therapist with the ability to address a variety of skill sets during their
therapy session.  With so many
holiday-themed mazes popping up this time of year let’s learn about the
benefits of doing them at home too!

1.             
Fine motor Control:
Mazes require your child to control his/her pencil through the maze without
hitting the black lines. This means that he must take his time rather than
rushing, in order to have greater success. Progress can be observed as your
child bumps into the black lines less and less as he gains greater control of
his writing utensil. Children use fine motor control in order to produce correct letter formation and legible handwriting.

2.             
Visual motor
integration: Mazes require your child to use his/her eyes to scan the entire
sheet in order to find possible solutions. Scanning is a great skill used for
reading and writing, as it is important to scan from the left side of the paper
to the right side.

3.             
Problem Solving: Mazes
help your child work on his/her executive functioning skills, such as planning various strategies (e.g.
starting from the beginning of the maze or working backwards from the end of
maze, using their finger first to prevent mistakes, etc.) 

4.             
Visual Attention: Mazes
require your child to pay attention to the task in front of them.  They have to pick out the details of
the maze to determine the right and wrong ways to go.  They also have to try to keep their eyes focused on the path
so they don’t lose their spot/direction they wanted to go.  Visual attention is a foundation skill
that is needed for all learning tasks!

5.             
Can be done multiple
ways:  Mazes can be broken down
into different steps. For example, first have your child start by moving his
finger, next a pencil, then a marker through the maze. This helps your child to
solve the same maze three times consecutively to work on all these skills!

 

Copy
and paste this link for some Halloween mazes:

http://www.dltk-holidays.com/halloween/m-maze.htm

By:
Laura Friedman, MS OTR/L


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AUTHOR: customer
TITLE: Whistles, Whistles Everywhere
STATUS: publish
ALLOW COMMENTS: 1
ALLOW PINGS: 1
CATEGORY: Development
CATEGORY: Speech Therapy

DATE: 8/9/2013 8:56:24 PM
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We want to help you understand how fun and helpful each whistle can be!  First, be sure to read the previous blog “Toot, Toot!!” for some background before reading “Whistles, Whistles Everywhere”.

Round whistles promote the motor planning for rounded sounds such as 00, 0, w


Flat whistles promote lip approximation sounds such as p,b, m

 

All whistles encourage tongue retraction- have to pull tongue back in the mouth or will bite it when using a whistle

 

Harmonicas promote lip retractions for the “ee” sound and teeth to lip approximation for “F” and “V” sounds.

 

All whistles require jaw stability of varying degrees based  on the length and shape of the mouthpiece as long as kids are not using teeth by biting the whistle to stabilize.  So playing with whistles will help a child to improve their jaw stability if he/she is not biting with their teeth.


Biting the whistle or a straw can indicate poor jaw stability as in the case of the mangled tops on sippy cups or on straws

 

Whistles also encourage respiratory grading (controlling the breath you allow out) which is necessary for longer sound sequences and sentences. As grading increases, sentence length can increase without the clarity of sounds being affected. For example, a kiddo with limited grading may leave off all final sounds because they run out of air.

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Creating the best life for all children